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Data frame :

200.01  117:10520   227137.56097561
200.01  155:24  227137.56097561
200.01  265:47  227137.56097561
200.01  266:37  227137.56097561
200.01  281:568 227137.56097561
200.01  282:246 227137.56097561
200.31  190:3374    227360
200.56  110:1261    227545.365853659
200.56  186:571 227545.365853659
200.66  114:969 227619.512195122
200.66  118:3886    227619.512195122

The data is the one presented. The question : I want to make one row from the duplicated columns. Example :

200.01  117:10520 155:24 265:47  266:37 281:568 282:246 227137.56097561
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do you want to have them all appear in one column? or in many columns? it sounds like you might instead want a list where each element can be any length –  Justin Nov 29 '12 at 17:31
    
I want it like in the example. So basically the example would be 1 row and after the algorithm it would be like 4 rows with : 200.01 200.31 200.56 200.66. And i would create a new frame –  alap Nov 29 '12 at 17:34
1  
I think that @Justin's question was "should 117:10520 ... 282:246" be one column or six columns. This looks to me like a very simple application of aggregate() if a single column is desired. –  Ananda Mahto Nov 29 '12 at 17:36
    
@mrdwab correct. especially if the number of duplicate entries can vary substantially you'll be better served with a named list rather than a many columned "sparse" data.frame. –  Justin Nov 29 '12 at 17:37
    
It should be one column. Yeah. Can you propose a solution? –  alap Nov 29 '12 at 17:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As mentioned in the comments, this is a pretty straightforward aggregate question:

Your data:

dat <- read.table(header = FALSE, stringsAsFactors=FALSE, text = "
                    200.01  117:10520   227137.56097561
                    200.01  155:24  227137.56097561
                    200.01  265:47  227137.56097561
                    200.01  266:37  227137.56097561
                    200.01  281:568 227137.56097561
                    200.01  282:246 227137.56097561
                    200.31  190:3374    227360
                    200.56  110:1261    227545.365853659
                    200.56  186:571 227545.365853659
                    200.66  114:969 227619.512195122
                    200.66  118:3886    227619.512195122")

Two options for aggregation. In the first one, V2 is a list. In the second option, V2 is a character string.

aggregate(V2 ~ V1 + V3, dat, c)
#       V1       V3                                                  V2
# 1 200.01 227137.6 117:10520, 155:24, 265:47, 266:37, 281:568, 282:246
# 2 200.31 227360.0                                            190:3374
# 3 200.56 227545.4                                   110:1261, 186:571
# 4 200.66 227619.5                                   114:969, 118:3886
aggregate(V2 ~ V1 + V3, dat, paste, collapse=" ")
#       V1       V3                                             V2
# 1 200.01 227137.6 117:10520 155:24 265:47 266:37 281:568 282:246
# 2 200.31 227360.0                                       190:3374
# 3 200.56 227545.4                               110:1261 186:571
# 4 200.66 227619.5                               114:969 118:3886

See also: R Grouping functions: sapply vs. lapply vs. apply. vs. tapply vs. by vs. aggregate vs.


If multiple columns are required, you might still want to aggregate and then split the columns up later using a custom function. One example function is tableFlatten shared by @RicardoSaporta, which will create as many columns as your longest list item. But, as @Justin mentioned in the comments, a list might be more useful depending on what you're trying to do.

dat2 <-  aggregate(V2 ~ V1 + V3, dat, c)
(dat2 <- tableFlatten(dat2))
#       V1       V3     V2.01    V2.02  V2.03  V2.04   V2.05   V2.06
# 1 200.01 227137.6 117:10520   155:24 265:47 266:37 281:568 282:246
# 2 200.31 227360.0  190:3374                                       
# 3 200.56 227545.4  110:1261  186:571                              
# 4 200.66 227619.5   114:969 118:3886 
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