Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a Python function that iterates over lines of the input argument, but can accept either a string or a file-like object. Is there a way to do this?

def myfunc(x):
   for line in x:
       doSomething(line)

The above code works for a file-like object but not strings, and I'd rather write just one function rather than two, since my real task is a lot more complex than the above.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are about a million variants you could use here with try-except

def myfunc(x):
    try:
       x = x.splitlines(True)
    except AttributeError:
       pass #likely a file

    for line in x:
       doSomething(line)

Another version (slightly less permissive -- see comments):

try:
   from cStringIO import StringIO
except ImportError:   #python 3
   from io import StringIO

def myfunc(x):
    try:
       x.seek(0)
    except AttributeError: #likely a string
       x = StringIO(x)

    for line in x:
       doSomething(line)
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd rather not test for file-like objects; you now limited yourself to files and read buffers (what StringIO can consume). I'd rather test for iterators (hasattr(x, 'next') or try: iter(x), except TypeError:). –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '12 at 17:34
    
iter("foo") and iter(open('file.txt')) both work. I suppose I could use hasattr(x,'next') though. Anyway, what the OP's try/except looks like depends a lot on what the API really should look like. OP just said strings and file objects. If you want to extend that to strings, file objects and other iterables, you could always use my first version. The possibilities here are endless with varying ranges of restrictive/permissiveness (which is part of the reason that I posted 2 options to demonstrate that). –  mgilson Nov 29 '12 at 17:41
    
accepted -- the extra polish here was the use of splitlines(True) which i had not been aware of; this makes the behavior between strings and lines of a file-like object essentially identical. –  Jason S Nov 29 '12 at 17:56

Use duck typing:

def myfunc(x):
    try:
        lines = x.split('\n')
    except AttributeError:
        lines = x
    for line in lines:
        doSomething(line)

You can also check the type, if you wish:

def myfunc(x):
    if isinstance(x, basestring):  # will work in Python >=2.3, <3.x
        lines = x.split('\n')
    else:
        lines = x
    for line in lines:
        doSomething(line)
share|improve this answer
    
will work in Python 2.x: Python 2.3 and up, in fact. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '12 at 17:28
    
@MartijnPieters: Thanks, updated. Just a side note, I wonder how many actively maintained applications running on Python <2.3 are out there. It is 9.5 years old now. –  Tadeck Nov 29 '12 at 17:32
    
I know of some ye olde Zope installations. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '12 at 17:34

It'll work for strings as well, but it'll iterate over the string character by character. The user should call your function with a list of strings instead.

If you explicitly want to support passing in one string, that then is to be interpreted as a line, you'll have to test for that:

def myfunc(x):
    if isinstance(x, basestring):
        # Interpret argument as one line
        x = [x]
    for line in x:
        doSomething(line)

Alternatively, you could split the string on newlines instead:

def myfunc(x):
    if hasattr(x, 'splitlines'):
        # Interpret argument as multiple lines:
        x = x.splitlines()
    for line in x:
        doSomething(line)
share|improve this answer
1  
isinstance(x, basestring) ? –  Jon Clements Nov 29 '12 at 17:23
    
@JonClements: I was unsure as to when that was introduced, was in the process of looking that up. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '12 at 17:24
    
About '03/'04 I think... –  Jon Clements Nov 29 '12 at 17:26
    
@JonClements: Python 2.3. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '12 at 17:27
    
So about 2003/2004 then ;) –  Jon Clements Nov 29 '12 at 17:28

If you just accept file-like objects, you can instruct callers to wrap string arguments in StringIO:

myfunc(StringIO(s))
share|improve this answer

isinstance(var, str) checks if var is of type str.

I don't remember of hand the type for a file, but you could the file var to find out. It will show in < ... >

You could use:

def myfunc(x):
   for line in x:
       if isinstance(line, str):
           print line
       else:
           # Its a file so do file things
share|improve this answer

One approach would be to use something like isinstance to determine if x was a string. If it was you could pass it to StringIO (or cStringIO) to make it a file like object and then proceed as you wanted. I have not tested this, but it would look roughly like:

def myfunc(x):
   if isinstance(x, str):
      x = StringIO.StringIO(x)
   for line in x:
      doSomething(line)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.