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In my php script I want to output data to the browser then sleep() for 2 seconds before running a function. The below doesnt seem to output the json before sleeping, anyone got any ideas?

if ($_POST['process'] == '1') {
    // adding stuff to $data here
    }

    echo json_encode($data);
    ob_flush();
    flush();
    sleep(2);
    // Do something else
}
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please paste complete code. in current code snippet, you missed { or } –  GBD Nov 29 '12 at 17:44
1  
I think you need to do ob_start(); first, so you create a buffer what gets flushed by flush. –  John Nov 29 '12 at 17:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yep, this is how you do it. Basically, you close the connection and return the response to the user while apache continues to process the file...

ignore_user_abort(true);
header('Content-Type: application/json');
header('Connection: close');
header('Content-Length: ' . strlen($YOUR_JSON_RESPONSE));

echo $YOUR_JSON_RESPONSE;
flush();

sleep(2);
your_cool_function_to_run();
die();

Works great for quick ajax calls that need an immediate response and/or take a long time to actually do the work.

I must warn you to use this type of thing sparingly... Each time this happens a new process/thread is opened up to handle the remainder of your request. Do too many too fast and you'll run out of processes. (Depending on your setup)

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+1 for the Connection: and Content-Length: headers. I think that those, in addition to closing STDOUT should do the trick. –  tomlogic Nov 29 '12 at 17:50
    
I've never heard of PHP script splitted across threads: do you have any reference? Also, threads and process are really different beasts –  Raffaele Nov 29 '12 at 17:54
    
I dont have a reference.. Correct my understanding if its wrong: Each user request to PHP opens an individual process and once the closure and response is sent that process ends. When you send a response in this manner and then continue the process it spawns a new php process to handle the processing. Since, you could let that function go on for minutes after the sleep(2), then the process would hang. –  phpisuber01 Nov 29 '12 at 17:59
    
Thanks phpisuber01 that worked a treat, I will also take your advice about using it sparingly, thanks again –  Woz Nov 29 '12 at 18:28
    
@phpisuber01 AFAIK, Apache can run the script internally (mod_php) or relay to an external process (FCGI, which really is a pool of processes last time I checked). When using mod_php, a script may be run in the single Apache process or in a thread from a threads pool or in a process from a processes pool (which is the most common setup I've seen), depending on the MPM. However I never read that the current process halts after a call to flush() - and honestly I don't know how that would help, since there would always be one process running... –  Raffaele Nov 29 '12 at 19:41

You could try closing STDOUT, to signal to the web server that your script is done sending data to the HTTP client.

fclose( STDOUT);
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