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I have being given the following question and can't decide the right answer:

for (int i=1; i<=n/2; i++)
  for(int j=i; j<=n-i;j++)
    for(int k=i;k<=j;k++)
      x++;

What's the order of growth of the x as a function of n?

  1. Ω(n^3).
  2. Θ(n^2.5)
  3. Θ(n^2)
  4. Ο(nlogn)
  5. none of the above

I managed to figure out that:

T(n) = n*(n-1) + T(n-2)

but this doesn't really help me figure out the order of growth. maybe there is a better way of finding it?

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closed as off topic by Jon B, David, N West, pb., Graviton Nov 30 '12 at 3:40

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it looks cubic to me. –  Sam I am Nov 29 '12 at 18:02
3  
but the fact that it has 3 nested loops doesn't really mean that it actually is cubic..why do u think it is? –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:08
    
Try finding the average value of i as a function of n, j as a function of i, and so on. –  isturdy Nov 29 '12 at 18:13
    
@atlanteh one reason i didn't post as an answer is because I don't actually know, But when you go from i to n-2, that's O(n), when you go from 0 to n-i as i increases, that averages to n/4, that's also O(n). The last statement is actually a little harder to evaluate, because it doesn't even use n, so you'll have to do that math. You might consider adding some print statements and running the code so you can better visualize what's happening. –  Sam I am Nov 29 '12 at 18:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This looks like a homework problem so I will just give you hints.

1) Suppose you just have the inner loop. How many times do you go through the inner loop, as a function of i and j? How many operations are performed every iteration of the loop? How many operations should be performed total?

2) Now suppose you just have the inner two loops. How many times do you go through the outer loop, as a function of i and n? How many times do you go through the inner loop every time you go through the outer loop? (hint: this should be different depending on what j is) How many operations should be performed total?

3) Now you are ready to look at the entire problem. How many times do you go through the inner two loops (as a function of n), and how many operations should be performed on each iteration? How many operations are performed total? (That's your answer)


Okay, you say this isn't a homework problem, and actually it's harder than I thought it was, so I'll just give you the answer.

Each inner loop runs in time j - i.

The second loop runs in time (i - i) + (i + 1 - i) + ... + (i + n - 2i - i) = 1 + 2 + ... + (n - 2i) = (n - 2i)(n - 2i + 1)/2, by mathematical induction.

When calculating order of growth, the 1 term is very small compared to the n, so the outer loop runs in approximately n^2/2 + (n-2)^2/2 + (n-4)^2/2 + ... + 1/2.

This is approximately one fourth of 1^2 + 2^2 + ... + n^2, which by induction is n(n+1)(2n+1)/6. Therefore the order of growth is Omega(n^3).

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it's not a homework, it's a question of a previous test that i can't figure out. –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:15
    
@atlanteh Okay, I edited it with the solution. Let me know if anything is confusing. –  i love stackoverflow Nov 29 '12 at 18:27
    
wow thx!! actually with your first help i managed to figure out the inner two loops. the only thing i couldn't get is: Modulo a constant factor, this is approximately half of 1 + 2 + ... + n^2, which by induction is n(n+1)(2n+1)/6. Therefore the order of growth is Omega(n^3). can you help? thx!! –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:38
1  
ohh actually i got it! thx! –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:45
    
1 + 2 + ... + n^2 = n^2(n^2+1)/2 or do you mean 1 + 4 + 9 + ... + n^2? –  Code-Apprentice Nov 29 '12 at 23:00

Someone mentioned print statements in the comments above. Here are some:

n = 20 --> x = 715
n = 21 --> x = 825
n = 22 --> x = 946
n = 23 --> x = 1078
n = 24 --> x = 1222
n = 25 --> x = 1378
n = 26 --> x = 1547
n = 27 --> x = 1729
n = 28 --> x = 1925
n = 29 --> x = 2135
n = 30 --> x = 2360
n = 31 --> x = 2600
n = 32 --> x = 2856
n = 33 --> x = 3128
n = 34 --> x = 3417
n = 35 --> x = 3723
n = 36 --> x = 4047
n = 37 --> x = 4389
n = 38 --> x = 4750
n = 39 --> x = 5130
n = 40 --> x = 5530
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thx. i actually made it myself =] thx anyway! –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:40

Analytically :

First note that k++ is O(1) so we just need to count how many times the loops run. I'll write it in a way so that it becomes easy to understand.

i=1    j=1  inner most loop runs= 1 time
       j=2  inner most loop runs= 2 times
       .
       .
       .
       j=n-1    inner most loop runs= n-1 time
                                  ---     
                                 O(n^2) times   
i=2    j=1  inner most loop runs= 1 time
       j=2  inner most loop runs= 2 times
       .
       .
       .
       j=n-2    inner most loop runs= n-2 time
                                  ---     
                                 O(n^2) times   

.
.
.

i=n/2  j=1  inner most loop runs= 1 time
       j=2  inner most loop runs= 2 times
       .
       .
       .
       j=n/2    inner most loop runs= n/2 time
                                  ---     
                                 O(n^2) times   




So we see that the inner 2 loops need O(n^2) time for each iteration, and they are executed O(n) times, so, the total time is at least cubic.

Let us run and see!

///sg

#include <stdio.h>
#include<time.h>
int main ()
{
float seconds;
int x;
for(int n=1;n<=1000;n++)
{
    x=0;
    clock_t start = clock();
for (int i=1; i<=n/2; i++)
  for(int j=i; j<=n-i;j++)
    for(int k=i;k<=j;k++)
      x++;

 clock_t end = clock();
 seconds = (float)(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
 printf("\n%f",seconds);
}
  return 0;
}

As we see , the order of growth is cubic, so that verifies the analysis ( i used octave for this)

The plot of running time vs n clearly concurs our understanding ( i used octave for this). So i conclude that the answer is (1).

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1  
wow!! amazing work!! thx alot!! –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:45

I tried to calculate it and I found T(n) = (13/12) * n * (n² + 3*n + 2) (maths rules !). So it is cubic. -> Answer 1.

EDIT : there was an error in the calculation. The real answer is T(n) = n * (n + 2) * (2*n - 1) / 24 :

demonstration

However it remains cubic.

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how did you get to that? –  atlanteh Nov 29 '12 at 18:38
    
@atlanteh : see the edit –  air-dex Nov 29 '12 at 23:52
    
thank you!! very informative!! –  atlanteh Nov 30 '12 at 8:13

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