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Whilst trying to improve the maintainability of an SP in one of our systems I decided that using a loop would be better than having an array of values (table names in this case) hard coded in and tried to re factor the code accordingly so that adding or removing a table to the system didn't require editing of the array. Leaving aside the whys and wherefores of loops for the moment (I know the arguments against them very well), can anyone explain what's happening?

Imagine two users, SourceUser and DestUser both in the same database, each with their tables in the same tablespace. A bunch of stored procedures in SourceUser populate data from SourceUser into DestUser for reporting purposes. As part of this, the first procedure to be run drops all the tables in DestUser and re-creates them. Again, not debating the relative merits of doing that here.

SourceUser has Drop Any Table and Create Any Table privileges on DestUser. There is one table in DestUser that we want to keep. So, the SQL I constructed in the procedure looks like this:

Begin
  For T In (SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM all_tables WHERE TABLE_NAME != 'MIDBLOG' AND OWNER = sTarget_DB) Loop
    Begin
      Execute Immediate('Drop Table ' || sTarget_DB || '.' || T.TABLE_NAME);

    Exception
      When Others Then
        --Don't care if we get an exception here as most likely the table wasn't there to be dropped in the first place.
        NULL;
    End;
  End Loop;
End;

In this case sTarget_DB is set to DestUser, and this code is being run against SourceUser.

When the procedure is run I find that no tables have been deleted (I confirmed that there were a couple of dozen tables including one named MIDBLOG before starting). I ran it in SQL Developer debug mode and the execution never even gets to the inside of the loop as it appears to think it has no rows to process but I know for certain that the select statement would return a couple of dozen table names.

Next I amended it to this:

Begin
  For T In (SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM all_tables WHERE OWNER = sTarget_DB) Loop
    Begin
      If T.TABLE_NAME != 'MIDBLOG' THEN
        Execute Immediate('Drop Table ' || sTarget_DB || '.' || T.TABLE_NAME);
      End If;
    Exception
      When Others Then
        --Don't care if we get an exception here as most likely the table wasn't there to be dropped in the first place.
        NULL;
    End;
  End Loop;
End;

After running this the only table that WAS removed was the very one I didn't want removed! Even more odd was that the loop only executed once, as though the select query was only returning one row. I could see it happening if I ran the procedure in debug on SQL Developer 3.2. We did the same thing on a colleagues PC on SQL Developer (possibly 3.1) and again the loop only executed once but this time it correctly decided not to drop the table MIDBLOG and again left everything else alone.

If I run either of the above examples as an anonymous block in SQL Developer it does exactly what I expect it to do. I tried the more verbose explicit cursor declaration and had the same results as before. At no time did I get any exceptions.

All this was on Oracle 10g Enterprise Edition Release 10.2.0.4.0 (64bit). As soon as tried it on Oracle 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0 (64bit) it worked just fine. Why on earth should such a basic requirement exhibit such wildly different behaviour across the two versions? Can it work as I want in both versions with the same bit of code?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess is that the problem is related to privileges not the version of Oracle. Are privileges on DestUser granted to SrcUser via a role in one database and via direct grants in the other?

Before running the anonymous PL/SQL block, what happens if you disable roles first?

set role none;
<<run the anonymous PL/SQL block>>

If you add instrumentation to the code, does the query against all_tables return the set of tables that you expect? My guess is that when the code fails, it is in a definer's rights stored procedure where the owner of the procedure has access to the DestUser tables via a role. Since privileges granted through a role are not visible in a definer's rights stored procedure, this would cause the SELECT statement in your loop to return 0 rows (though running the same query interactively would return the rows you expect). If the privileges on the DestUser tables are granted directly, on the other hand, the same definer's rights stored procedure would run successfully. And it would work in an anonymous PL/SQL block.

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I'll check any roles etc, but in all cases the grants are direct rather than by role. What puzzles me is why one person gets 0 rows yet another gets 1 row on the 10g server. Both are using the same login and therefore have the same privileges. I'll try disabling the roles and report back. The query against all_tables returns exactly what I expect in isolation which is why I do not understand how it can vary between computers and servers. –  Steve Pettifer Nov 30 '12 at 9:40
    
OK, as you suggested I've tried disabling all roles before running the anonymous block on both servers and sure enough the result is what you suggested too: set roles none => the anonymous block does nothing and running the select on it's own produces no results. I'm forced to conclude that we have an inconsistency in our set up between the two servers so if I want to persist with this I'll need to investigate how we have roles working on our (and our customer) servers. Shame, much neater solution than an array of tables names!! –  Steve Pettifer Nov 30 '12 at 9:55
    
Thanks to pressures of development schedules this will have to continue as an academic aside, but worryingly our users (SourceUser and DestUser) are granted the DBA role which I would have thought would be sufficient but perhaps SPs are executed under the authority of some other system user. Not being an Oracle DBA I'm a little in over my head at this point but will continue to read up about it. Many thanks for your help though. –  Steve Pettifer Nov 30 '12 at 10:25
    
@StevePettifer - Granting any user the DBA role is a bad idea from a security standpoint. Since all roles are invisible in a definer's rights stored procedure, though, a definer's rights stored procedure cannot use privileges that are granted to the DBA role or any other role. It can only make use of privileges that are granted directly to the user. –  Justin Cave Nov 30 '12 at 15:32
    
I completely agree - when I discovered that I was surprised and more than a bit concerned. As an addendum I have discovered that by adding authid current_user to the SP declaration sorts the problems and ensures that the stored procedure does inherit the correct permission to achieve what I wanted. The purpose and theory of this was explained nicely here: docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/appdev.102/b14261/… –  Steve Pettifer Nov 30 '12 at 17:31

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