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My goal is to create a data structure implementing IList<T> interface which will achieve O(1) element lookup time by compromising memory.

Background As you know all array based IList<T> implementations like List<T> have O(n) element lookup time. It means that the operations like int IndexOf(T element) or bool Contains(T element) iterate through the underlaying array until they find a match.

Well known idea achive that is to use a combination of a list and hashtable as underlaying data structures. Values are kept in a list. The hashtable will keep indexes as values and values of list as keys. So lookup can be performed using hashtable.

That's exactly how the KeyedCollection<TKey, TItem> see MSDN is implemented.

What I have tried so far

internal class MyList<T> : KeyedCollection<T, T>
{
    protected override T GetKeyForItem(T item)
    {
        return item;
    }
}

This worked so far except one problem. This data structure does not mimic the behavior expected behind List<T> exactly. The point is that the List<T> allows duplicates, MyList does not.

Question

Is there any ready to use data structure or can you recommend an elegant way of implementing the IList<T> so that:

  1. Lookup operations have O(1) time.
  2. All other operations have same O() performance as List<T>
  3. Memory can be compromised by hashtable overhead (constantA + constantB * n bytes).
  4. Duplicates must be allowed
  5. Allowing nulls is optional (they can be boxed into null objects)
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closed as not a real question by cadrell0, Servy, dove, hims056, Mario Nov 30 '12 at 13:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What do you mean by "duplicates must be allowed". Do you need to keep each instance of the duplicate, ignore the duplicate, overwrite the duplicate? –  Stealth Rabbi Nov 29 '12 at 18:19
1  
I think the trickiest piece of this will be matching the definition of IndexOf that states: "If an object occurs multiple times in the list, the IndexOf method always returns the first instance found." –  pstrjds Nov 29 '12 at 18:19
5  
You keep comparing your data structure to a List and a Set at the same time. Not only does performance differ between the two, but the APIs differ greatly. Sets are unordered, lists are ordered, and that makes a big difference. Will you collection be ordered? Having a set/map that allows duplicates is called a "bag" (which is still unordered). Having a List that has O(1) search speed just doesn't exist. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:19
1  
@achitaka-san Then it's not possible. Done. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:28
2  
Best case scenario you marry a Dictionary<T,LinkedList<T>> and List<LinkedListNode<T>>. Horrific to handle things like dictMapListHashStructKerfloovy[17] = newValue;. –  user7116 Nov 29 '12 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Building on what Ryan Bennett has proposed, I think the best you are going to come up with (as you state order is important) is to create a class that implements IList and then internally has something like this:

class MyList<T> : IList<T>
{
    Dictionary<T, List<int>> _indexMap;
    List<T> _items;


    public int IndexOf(T item)
    {
        List<int> indices;
        if(_indexMap.TryGetValue(item, out indices))
        {
            return indices[0];
        }
        return -1;
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        List<int> indices;
        if(!_indexMap.TryGetValue(item, out indices))
        {
            indices = new List<int>();
            _indexMap[item] = indices;
        }

        indices.Add(_items.Count);
        _items.Add(item);
    }

    // Attempt at a Remove implementation, this could probably be improved
    // but here is my first crack at it
    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        List<int> indices;
        if(!_indexMap.TryGetValue(item, out indices))
        {
            // Not found so can just return false
            return false;
        }

        int index = indices[0];
        indices.RemoveAt(0);
        if (indices.Count == 0)
        {
            _indexMap.Remove(item);
        }

        for(int i=index+1; i < _items.Count; ++i)
        {
            List<int> otherIndexList = _indexMap[_items[i]];
            for(int j=0; j < otherIndexList.Count; ++j)
            {
                int temp = otherIndexList[j];
                if (temp > index)
                {
                    otherIndexList[j] = --temp;
                }
            }
        }

        return _items.RemoveAt(index);
    }

    // ... Other similar type functions here
}

Edit:

Just realized that things get real sticky here when you do a Remove. You will have to walk the collection of indices and update any index with a value > the index of the item you remove. You have now increased the "remove" time. You have also made it tricky to get correct. I would throw a massive amount of unit tests around this collection if you were going to try to implement something like this.

I know you are stating order is important so I am assuming that is why you are not going wtih a Sorted list approach which would allow the duplicates and give you O(log n) operation times.

Edit 2: Another book keeping type approach
I am just bouncing this one around in my head and so I will only give some rough pseudo code but you could possibly take an approach where you just have a dictionary of items mapped to a list of indices and a second dictionary that maps indices to items. If you add the restriction that T is a class then you are only paying the overhead of two storages of the reference. You then need to maintain a current "last" so that you can easily add a new item into the collection. This should make the remove operation a bit cleaner. It is still O(n) because you have to update anything with an index > the removed item. In first imaginings, this seems like a potential solution that will get you close to what you want to achieve (if I am understanding the goals correctly).

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Instead of a List<int> I'd use LinkedList<int>. This avoids array-shift the List<int> would incur when Remove(T item) is called on MyList<T> by always removing the First element by calling RemoveFirst(). :) –  hIpPy Nov 29 '12 at 18:46
    
@hIpPy Actually a LinkedList would almost certainly be slower in practice. While add/remove operations are O(1) if you have a reference to the node, search speed isn't O(1) anymore, it's O(n), and a particularly slow O(n) at that. Linked lists lose memory logicality over array-based structures, so using them results in much slower access to items, lots more cache misses, etc. This dramatically hurts performance for operations that have the same big O value as array based structures. On top of that, the end up using quite a bit more memory thanks to memory fragmentation. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:49
    
@Servy, Or the last element could be removed from the List<int>. –  hIpPy Nov 29 '12 at 18:52
    
@hIpPy Not sure what you're trying to say. Removing the last element from a List is O(1). I assume you meant to say the first, as that would be O(n)? Removing the first item from a List is actually quite a bit quicker than removing the last item from a LinkedList, despite them both being O(n). –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:59
1  
@pstrjds I am afraid I didn't get why O(n^2)? O(n) for insert + O(n) for update is still 2 * O(n) = O(n) and not O(n^2). –  achitaka-san Nov 29 '12 at 21:38

The only way I could see this is using a dictionary of lists. Hitting the key gives you a list of all duplicates that create that particular key. Just always take the first one.

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That's true if he wants a map with duplicate keys. If he wants a set then that wouldn't work. (He switches between the two as to what he's implying in the OP, so I have no idea which he really needs.) –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:23
    
Thanks. Sure it will work. I have also considered similar solution. The problem is the list overhed which will rarely contain more than one element. Still waiting for more "elegant" solution, otherwise will accept yours. –  achitaka-san Nov 29 '12 at 18:25
    
@achitaka-san So you don't need an ordered collection, despite your repeated comments indicating otherwise? –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:27
    
Ryan, apparently he needs an ordered collection, so this isn't an option. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:28
    
@Servy - I think I start understanding you. Could you please explain us better why order is not preserved in this solution? –  achitaka-san Nov 29 '12 at 18:39

The hash table should hold a list of indices for each key. And I think this is all you need, no?

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1  
But then you don't have the proper performance for all of your methods. Searching would be okay but not removing, as you'll need to maintain both data structures. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:26
    
@Servy Totally agree. –  achitaka-san Nov 29 '12 at 18:34

If you can develop a structure with O(1) search time you will find yourself becoming very very rich :p

Basically this type of structure doesn't exist, the closest this to this is a Hash table

C# has a built in hash table type - C~ Hash Table

share|improve this answer
1  
The entire premise of the OP is that he's looking for hash tables that allow duplicates; this would indicate he's familiar with the concept of a hash table already, and that it doesn't solve his problem(s). –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:24
1  
Yes... and what he's looking for doesn't exist. Even the hash table itself doesn't have O(1) search time. –  Eamonn McEvoy Nov 29 '12 at 18:38
    
Yes, the best thing achievable here is average case O(1) lookup. In the worst case, hashtables are still O(n). That said, having an average case O(1) lookup is indeed valuable, just saying. –  Duh Nov 29 '12 at 18:44
    
@EamonnMcEvoy Hash table search time is O(1)... in the average case. Yes, the worst case is different, but after decades of CS research and experiments that case is so rare it's rarely worth mentioning (when discussing mature real-world implementations). –  delnan Nov 29 '12 at 18:44
2  
@delnan Actually, the O-ness of a hash based structure is primarily based on the quality of the hash function of the key. If you use a custom type with a custom hash function, and implement it poorly, it's quite easy to end up with O(n) access time (or even worse, if your hash function can't be computed in O(1) time). Now, when using something like a string, or other common hash keys with hash functions written by the library, you can generally trust them to be written well enough to result in (close enough to) O(1) access. –  Servy Nov 29 '12 at 18:47

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