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Quick question, SimpleDateFormat is not performing as I would expect. I am looking to get a date string that look like Thursday 29 November 13:43.

Here is my format:

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();  
_clockDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("cccc dd MMMM kk:mm");  
_clockDateFormat.format(c.getTime());

Here is the output:

5 29 11 13:43

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
What is cccc? I dont know this pattern. go to docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/text/…. –  Maxim Shoustin Nov 29 '12 at 19:06
    
From the android documentation c|stand-alone day of week|(Text/Number)|Tuesday/2 –  FlyingStreudel Nov 29 '12 at 19:09
    
@MaximShoustin It is in the javadoc‌​: stand-alone day of week. To be honest I'm not sure how it can be used. –  assylias Nov 29 '12 at 19:09
2  
Are you sure you want kk rather than HH? That's pretty unusual. –  Jon Skeet Nov 29 '12 at 19:13
1  
@assylias: My guess is that it's for when all you're displaying. When it's part of a full date/time, I suspect EEEE is the more appropriate format specifier. –  Jon Skeet Nov 29 '12 at 19:20

4 Answers 4

Instead of c use E:

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();  
SimpleDateFormat _clockDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE dd MMMM kk:mm");  
System.out.println(_clockDateFormat.format(c.getTime())); 

output:

Thursday 29 November 14:05

See the documentation for more info.

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I think the link is pointing at the wrong javadoc. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 29 '12 at 19:11
    
@BheshGurung: It is pointing to java5 javadoc. I clicked one more time to make sure. –  Nambari Nov 29 '12 at 19:12
1  
I still get the numeric values even with EEEE –  FlyingStreudel Nov 29 '12 at 19:13
    
Sorry, I meant to say wrong version (or wrong class). There is no c in that list. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 29 '12 at 19:13
    
@FlyingStreudel: I guess something wrong going on with your code then, I would suggest refresh and see. –  Nambari Nov 29 '12 at 19:14

Have you tried:

 _clockDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE dd MMMM kk:mm");
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In my pc I have tried the following

 Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();  
    SimpleDateFormat _clockDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy dd MMMM kk:mm");  
    _clockDateFormat.format(c.getTime());
    System.out.println(_clockDateFormat.format(c.getTime()));

if i use 'cccc' in simpledateformat it gives an error!!!

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2  
yyyy is the year, not the day of the week. –  assylias Nov 29 '12 at 19:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Turns out the device I am working with doesn't have a default locale when it gets here from the factory. As a workaround I used the Locale specific overload for SimpleDateFormat:

_clockDateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE dd MMMM HH:mm", Locale.US);

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