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I'm trying to understand this notation of whats going on here Example also below. I'm looking to see if anyone can supply additional code to help me make sense of this. How do I extend junk with T? what does that imply?

public class Junk<T extends Junk>
{

    public Junk()
    {

    }

    public T returnType()
    {
        return null; //? what would I even return
    }

    //what would I do to make sense of this class
}
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

T is a generic type parameter. You know it is a Junk, or a subclass of it. To return anything useful from your method, you'd need some other methods using the same type. For example:

public class Junk<T extends Junk> {
    T var;

    public void setT(T var) {
        this.var = var;
    }

    public T returnType(){
        return var;
    }
}

It can be used by creating instances where the type parameter is specified:

Junk junk = new Junk<Junk>();
junk.setT(new Junk<Junk>());
junk.returnType();

This is more useful than simply using "Junk" instead of "T", because subtypes can be used without losing type-safety. If you have a subclass SubclassJunk, then you can do:

Junk junk = new Junk<SubclassJunk>();
junk.setT(new SubclassJunk<Junk>());
SubclassJunk subclass = junk.returnType();
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pardon me for making an educated guess, but,

It looks like T is an undefined type,

the statement <T extends junk> looks like a constraint to ensure that T derives from Junk

so if you have a class like

public class SmallJunk extends Junk
{

}

then T can be aSmallJunk, but not other types.

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You need public class SmallJunk extends Junk<SmallJunk> in order to tell Junk what T should stand for. – Code-Apprentice Nov 29 '12 at 19:14

class Junk<T extends Junk> is the syntax for generic programming in Java. It means that wherever the type T is used in the class, it must stand for some (as yet unknown) subclass of Junk.

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Given

public class junk<T extends junk<T>>
{

    public T returnType()
    {
        return (T)this;
    }
}

you would extend it as

public class Subclass extends junk<Subclass> {
}

and the inherited returnType method would then return Subclass. The most prominent example of this pattern in the standard Java libraries is enum types, where an enum Foo becomes a class that extends Enum<Foo>

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I believe you would still have to cast return "this" to T. – tjg184 Nov 29 '12 at 19:16
    
@tjg184 good point. – Ian Roberts Nov 29 '12 at 19:17
    
This is wrong. T extends junk<T> but junk<T> does not necessarily extend T – newacct Nov 29 '12 at 23:50
    
@newacct See Angelika Langer's excellent generics FAQ for an explanation of how this pattern works for Enum. – Ian Roberts Nov 30 '12 at 0:00
    
@IanRoberts: Umm... I know generics. And I am talking about your (T)this being wrong. – newacct Nov 30 '12 at 4:04

You should read this article to understand it: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/bounded.html

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