Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My end goal is to have a fluid <img> that won't expand past an explicitly set height of a parent/grandparent element using only css.

Currently I'm doing this with a normal (max-width:100; height:auto;) fluid image and javascript by reading the height/width attributes from the img tag, calculating the aspect ratio, calculating the correct width of the image at the desired height restriction, and applying that width as a max-width on the image's container element. Pretty simple, but I'd love to be able to do it without javascript.

height:100%; width:auto; doesn't work the same as its transverse, and I've made some attempts with Unc Dave's ol' padded box and absolute positioning that function but require knowing the aspect ratio of the image beforehand and therefore cannot be applied across images that have different proportions. So the final requirement is the css must be proportion agnostic.

I know, I know, the answer to this question is probably sitting next to the unicorn farm, but I thought I'd throw it out there anyways.

share|improve this question
    
I'm having a hard time understanding why max-height: wouldn't work. Could you provide example HTML + CSS + images which demonstrate the problem? –  KatieK Jan 17 '13 at 21:37
    
Doesn't work, check this fiddle: jsfiddle.net/Z9yFJ/4. You know, honestly I can't remember why I needed this. –  RobW Jan 17 '13 at 23:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The trick is to add both max-height: 100%; and max-width: 100%; to .container img. Example CSS:

.container {
  width: 300px;
  border: dashed blue 1px;
}

.container img {
  max-height: 100%;
  max-width: 100%;
}

In this way, you can vary the specified width of .container in whatever way you want (200px or 10% for example), and the image will be no larger than its natural dimensions. (You could specify pixels instead of 100% if you didn't want to rely on the natural size of the image.)

Here's the whole fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/KatieK/Su28P/1/

share|improve this answer
    
This works well as long as the image is taller than the container. Thanks. –  RobW Jan 18 '13 at 17:29

I know you we're looking for a js alternative but this is a tidy little CSS (not JS) framework which might interest you. http://designshack.net/articles/css/focal-point-intelligent-cropping-of-responsive-images/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.