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I have a nested table arrangement for displaying data. I want the nested table to be in a TD that spans all the parent table columns. So I have colspan set. However I also want the user to be able to click on the parent to hide/unhide the child data. This works fine in IE8, but in FireFox and Chrome the nested table is ignoring the colspan and is only sown in the first column.

The code below is an example of the problem. If you click the first column text you'll see what I mean. The final row of data isn't classed so it shows ok on page load, but once the class is set it goes wrong again.

Any thoughts?

Thanks.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//thD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/thD/xhtml1-transitional.thd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=iso-8859-1">
<script type="text/javascript">
function expandRow(rowID, clickRow)
{
    var item = document.getElementById(rowID);
    if(item.className=='hidden'){
    	item.className = 'unhidden';
    }else{
    	item.className = 'hidden';
    }
}
</script>
<style type="text/css">
.hidden { display: none; }
.unhidden { display: block; }
</style>
<title>Table Test</title>
</head>
<body>
<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>Col1</th>
      <th>Col2</th>
      <th>Col3</th>
      <th>Col4</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td class="collapsed" onclick="expandRow('id30', this);">Click Here to Expand</td>
      <td>data1</td>
      <td>data2</td>
      <td>data3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="hidden" id="id30">
      <td colspan="4">
        <table>
          <tbody>
            <tr>
              <td>data1</td>
              <td>data2</td>
              <td>data3</td>
              <td>data4</td>
              <td>data5</td>
            </tr>
          </tbody>
        </table>
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="collapsed" onclick="expandRow('id95', this);">Click Here to Expand</td>
      <td>data1</td>
      <td>data2</td>
      <td>data3</td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="hidden" id="id95">
      <td colspan="4">
        <table>
          <tbody>
            <tr>
              <td>data1</td>
              <td>data2</td>
              <td>data3</td>
              <td>data4</td>
              <td>data5</td>
            </tr>
          </tbody>
        </table>
      </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td class="collapsed" onclick="expandRow('id96', this);">Click Here to Expand</td>
      <td>This one</td>
      <td>displays ok</td>
      <td>until you set the class!</td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="id96">
      <td colspan="4">
        <table>
          <tbody>
            <tr>
              <td>data1</td>
              <td>data2</td>
              <td>data3</td>
              <td>data4</td>
              <td>data5</td>
            </tr>
          </tbody>
        </table>
      </td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
</body>
</html>
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Get rid of your unhidden class entirely - it's completely redundant. Instead just remove the hidden class from the element to allow it to return to it's natural state, in this case:

item.className = '';

But normally I would recommend a replacement:

item.className = item.className.replace(/\bhidden\b/gi,'');

(and fwiw, personally I find "removed" more semantically correct than "hidden" which I would reserve for dealing with the visibility property)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. The solution is so blindingly obvious I could be quite embarrassed that I didn't think of it before posting. Your comment on the use of removed over hidden also makes sense, so I shall get that sorted at the same time. –  javadeveloper Sep 2 '09 at 9:17

change the css line about unhidden to: .unhidden { display: table-row; }

block is an invalid style for trs.

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1  
if you do this the .unhidden class becomes useful only to certain element types, and older browsers won't recognise the value. Better to keep a generic class generically useful. –  annakata Sep 1 '09 at 16:21

I solved it, using this info by just declaring

.vis {
    display: block; 
    display: table-row;
}

Old Internet Explorers ignores the table-row. Firefox and Internet Explorer 8 use it.

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only change this part of CSS

<style type="text/css">
.hidden { display: none; }
.unhidden { display:; }
</style>
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1  
that is so not going to parse, you're jsut getting the effect of having no rule at all –  annakata Sep 1 '09 at 16:11

Why don't you just remove the styling altogether:

<style type="text/css">
.hidden { display: none; }
.unhidden { }
</style>
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