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jQuery(document).on('click', 'a[id^="MenuFilterVar_"]', onClickHandler);
jQuery(document).off('click', 'a[title="Special Case Element"]'); 

The above code attaches an event to the elements that meet the selector in on(). However, when I remove the event with off() in the subsequent line (a special case element within those original elements), it removes all of the events for the elements from line one.

To my understanding, off() should only remove the event from the items meeting the selector. Am I missing something in my understanding of on/off, or is there something wrong with my code? Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Well, you are binding the handler to the document and removing the handler that was bound to the document. So .off is removing all the handler since it is not direct binding.. –  Vega Nov 29 '12 at 19:26
    
@Vega Isn't jQuery(document) the context to use my binding? I thought that reads as: at the document level, bind this onclick handler to these elements. Admittedly, I'm pretty new to jQuery, so I could be wrong. –  Yatrix Nov 29 '12 at 19:28
    
True.. They should be handling it.. but from your question it seems like they are not.. but let me double check. –  Vega Nov 29 '12 at 19:29
1  
From jQuery docs - To remove specific delegated event handlers, provide a selector argument. The selector string must exactly match the one passed to .on() when the event handler was attached. To remove all delegated events from an element without removing non-delegated events, use the special value "**". –  Vega Nov 29 '12 at 19:52
    
@Vega so basically I can't do it that way with differing selectors. –  Yatrix Nov 29 '12 at 19:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like for .off on delegated events you need to use the same selector as you have in .on. Below is from jQuery docs...

To remove specific delegated event handlers, provide a selector argument. The selector string must exactly match the one passed to .on() when the event handler was attached. To remove all delegated events from an element without removing non-delegated events, use the special value "**".

http://api.jquery.com/off/

You can simply add that condition if it is just 1 element. See below,

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/4rDgP/4/

function onClickHandler() {
    alert($(this).text());
}

jQuery(document).on('click', 'a[id^="MenuFilterVar_"]', function() {
    if (this.title == 'Special Case Element') return;   
    onClickHandler.call(this);
});

or If it is multiple elements then you can bind another handler for those elements you want to ignore and do an e.stopImmediatePropagation(). See below,

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/4rDgP/3/

jQuery(document).on('click', 'a[title="Special Case Element"]', function (e) {
     e.stopImmediatePropagation();
}); 
jQuery(document).on('click', 'a[id^="MenuFilterVar_"]', onClickHandler);    

Note that the e.stopImmediatePropagation(); should be above the actual handler binding.

share|improve this answer

I think if you change your selectors around, it should work.

jQuery('a[id^="MenuFilterVar_"]').on('click', onClickHandler);
jQuery('a[title="Special Case Element"]').off('click');

http://jsfiddle.net/dboots/4rDgP/1/

share|improve this answer
1  
yes, this is correct. Per jquery "When multiple filtering arguments are given, all of the arguments provided must match for the event handler to be removed." By using the jQuery(document) for the "on", you have to use the exact same select for the "off". –  Benjamin Powers Nov 29 '12 at 19:48
    
This didn't work. It didn't unattach the event. –  Yatrix Nov 29 '12 at 19:53
    
@BenjaminPowers so how is this correct, then? Your comment differs from what his answer is showing. –  Yatrix Nov 29 '12 at 19:55
    
Yes, it works (check the jsfiddle he included). My comment is consistent with the answer in this way: let's say that you have 3 elements that match the "MenuFilterVar_" selector. If you use that selector in the .on(), you'll need to have those exact same 3 elements from a selector in the .off(). The answer works because putting the selector to the left of the .on() means that there will be 3 ons with a single element instead of 1 on for three elements. –  Benjamin Powers Nov 29 '12 at 19:59
    
@BenjaminPowers it doesn't work in my code, however. From jQuery: To remove specific delegated event handlers, provide a selector argument. The selector string must exactly match the one passed to .on() when the event handler was attached. To remove all delegated events from an element without removing non-delegated events, use the special value "*".* I don't know why it works in jsfiddle, but it doesn't look like it's supposed to. –  Yatrix Nov 29 '12 at 21:42

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