Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written a template Link list, but when I try to add an object to it I get the error "C2512 'Customer': No Appropriate default constructor available" thrown from the node constructor.

Code:

#pragma once
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class node;

template <class T>
class l_list
{

public:
    l_list() { head = tail = NULL; }
    ~l_list();
    void add(T &obj);
    T remove(int ID);
    void print(ostream &out);

private:
    node<T> *head, *tail;
};

template <class T>
class node
{
public:
    template<class> friend class l_list;
    node() {next = NULL;}
private:
    T data;
    node *next;
};

template <class T>
l_list<T>::~l_list()
{
}

template <class T>
void l_list<T>::add(T &obj)
{
    node<T> *ptr = new node<T>;
    ptr -> data = obj;
    ptr -> next = head;
    head = ptr;

    if (tail == NULL) {tail = ptr;}
}

template <class T>
T l_list<T>::remove(int ID)
{
    int i = 0;
    node<T> * ptr = head;

    while (ptr -> data -> id != ID)
    {
        ptr = ptr -> next;
    }
}

template <class T>
void l_list<T>::print(ostream &out)
{
    int i = 0;
    node<T> *ptr = head;
    while ( ptr != NULL )
    {
        out << ptr -> data << endl;
        ptr = ptr -> next;
        i++;
    }
}

and the object that I try and put in the list

l_list<Customer> customers;
Customer bob("Bob", "25 Bob Lane", "01bob82", "M", "bob/bob/bob");
customers.add(bob);

edit to add Customer:

#pragma once
#include "l_list.h"
#include "Account.h"
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Customer
{
private:
    l_list<Account> accounts;
    string name;
    string address;
    string telNo;
    string sex;
    string dob;

public:
    Customer(string name, string address, string telNo, string sex, string dob)
    {
        Customer::name = name;
        Customer::address = address;
        Customer::telNo = telNo;
        Customer::sex = sex;
        Customer::dob = dob;
    }

    void createAccount()
    {
        cout << "What type of account?";

    }

    ~Customer()
    {
    }
};
share|improve this question
2  
Can you show Customer? –  imreal Nov 29 '12 at 19:40
3  
Chances are you didn't include a default constructor in Customer and now node is trying to default-construct your data member. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 19:41
    
Added Customer to OP –  Awia Nov 29 '12 at 19:42
    
Include this, just in case: Customer() {} –  hinafu Nov 29 '12 at 19:46
    
I feel the need to point out that this should work if you use something like int instead of Customer. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This line:

node<T> *ptr = new node<T>

Is trying to default-construct a T within node. Since there is no default constructor, no compiley =P

You can address this by using the copy constructor (which you define or use the default one , so long as T properly complies with The Rule of Three) or by defining a default constructor for T. I prefer the former if I want to harden construct access to T

node<T> *ptr = new node<T>(obj);

Of course, you need to define a proper constructor for node<T>::node(const T&)

class node
{
public:
    template<class> friend class l_list;

    // T-copy-ctor-based constructor
    node(const T& obj) : data(obj), next(NULL) {};

private:
    T data;
    node *next;
};

Been a slow morning so sorry if I messed something up in there. =P

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, this fixed it perfectly. –  Awia Nov 29 '12 at 20:14
    
@user1864298 Glad it helped. –  WhozCraig Nov 29 '12 at 20:16

The problem is in the function body of void l_list::add(T &obj), since if you use the default constructor of node it also uses the default constructor of the members, i.e. T data, which is obviously not defined. Do not use the default constructor of node, but instead define a node constructor that takes an argument T& obj and initializes the member data with the reference obj. If you use only pointers to node in the linked list, it should work.

share|improve this answer

The reason for the complaint is T data; in your node class. When you call add, it tries to construct a T, which is a Customer. Customer does not have a constructor with no arguments, so it does not work.

You could:

  1. Add a default constructor (no parameters)
  2. Add an assignment operator so that you can assign correctly to data

or

  • Pass the obj from add into the constructor for node and initialize it correctly.

or

  • Have data be a pointer and allocate new Customer objects to add.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.