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Stack<Animal> myStack = new Stack<Animal>();
Animal a = new Animal();
a.setValueOfAnimal(5);
myStack.push(a);
a.setValueOfAnimal(15);
System.out.println(myStack.pop().getValueOfAnimal());

Above you see a sample main method.

The output will be : 15.

Is there anyway to make the object in the stack safe? I do not want the object in the stack to be modified when I modify the value of "Animal a".

Is this supported by any built - in Java class?

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Any object you want the stack to make a copy of must first be copyable, e.g., by implementing the Clonable interface, which requires that it implement .clone(). No data structure can make a copy of an object if it's not clear how a copy should be made. –  apsillers Nov 29 '12 at 19:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I do not want the object in the stack to be modified when I modify the value of "Animal a".

Then you would have to create new instance of Animal.

When you add the Animal reference in the Stack, you are just storing a copy of the reference, which points to the same Animal. So, if you modify your Animal instance using original reference, it is also modified for the reference in the Stack.

So, you need to modify your code like this: -

myStack.push(a);
a = new Animal(); // Make the reference `a` point to a new instance.
a.setValueOfAnimal(15);
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You can't, unless you add a = new Animal() after myStack.push(a);.

What you could also do is provide a copy constructor:

public Animal(Animal someAnimal) {
    this.value = someAnimal.value;
}

You could then write:

myStack.push(new Animal(a)); //put a copy in the stack
share|improve this answer
    
You are quick. ;) –  Rohit Jain Nov 29 '12 at 19:42
    
But your answer is more complete ;-) –  assylias Nov 29 '12 at 19:43
    
@assylias.. Yeah. I prefer to post an explanatory answer. ;) –  Rohit Jain Nov 29 '12 at 19:45
1  
@RohitJain Et voila - I have added some meat... –  assylias Nov 29 '12 at 19:46

Nulling references after pushing would make objects on stack safe:

Animal a = new Animal();
a.setValueOfAnimal(5);
myStack.push(a);
a = null;  // remark here.
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