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How do I, in a shell script, create a file called foo.conf and make it contain:

NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use a "here document":

cat > foo.conf << EOF
NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
EOF
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what does the << do? –  Brian Bolton Feb 28 at 13:48
1  
@BrianBolton That says a "here document" will follow. –  ams Feb 28 at 13:50
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a heredoc might be the simplest way:

cat <<END >foo.conf
NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
END
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You can do that with echo:

echo 'NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>' > foo.conf

Everything enclosed by single quotes are interpreted as literals, so you just write that block into a file called foo.conf. If it doesn't exist, it will be created. If it does exist, it will be overwritten.

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2  
This works, but is limited by the maximum command line length. –  ams Nov 29 '12 at 20:04
    
Also it only works as long as you don't have apostrophes in the document. –  mornfall Dec 15 '13 at 10:50
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