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I have the following query building a recordset which is used in a pie-chart as a report.

It's not run particularly often, but when it does it takes several seconds, and I'm wondering if there's any way to make it more efficient.

SELECT
  CASE
    WHEN (lastStatus IS NULL)     THEN 'Unused'
    WHEN (attempts > 3 AND callbackAfter IS NULL)   THEN 'Max Attempts Reached'
    WHEN (callbackAfter IS NOT NULL AND callbackAfter >  DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)) THEN 'Call Back After 7 Days'
    WHEN (callbackAfter IS NOT NULL AND callbackAfter <= DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)) THEN 'Call Back Within 7 Days'
    WHEN (archived = 0)     THEN 'Call Back Within 7 Days'
    ELSE 'Spoke To'
  END AS statusSummary,
  COUNT(leadId) AS total
FROM
  CO_Lead
WHERE
  groupId = 123
  AND
  deleted = 0
GROUP BY
  statusSummary
ORDER BY
  total DESC;

I have an index for (groupId, deleted), but I'm not sure it would help to add any of the other fields into the index (if it would, how do I decide which should go first? callbackAfter because it's used the most?)

The table has about 500,000 rows (but will have 10 times that a year from now.)

The only other thing I could think of was to split it out into 6 queries (with the WHEN clause moved into the WHERE), but that makes it take 3 times as long.

EDIT:

Here's the table definition

CREATE TABLE CO_Lead (
  objectId                             int UNSIGNED       NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  groupId                              int UNSIGNED       NOT NULL,
  numberToCall                         varchar(20)        NOT NULL,
  firstName                            varchar(100)       NOT NULL,
  lastName                             varchar(100)       NOT NULL,
  attempts                             tinyint            NOT NULL default 0,
  callbackAfter                        datetime           NULL,
  lastStatus                           varchar(30)        NULL,
  createdDate                          datetime           NOT NULL,
  archived                             bool               NOT NULL default 0,
  deleted                              bool               NOT NULL default 0,
  PRIMARY KEY (
    objectId
  )
) ENGINE = InnoDB;
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD CONSTRAINT UQIX_CO_Lead UNIQUE INDEX (
  objectId
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  groupId,
  archived,
  deleted,
  callbackAfter,
  attempts
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  groupId,
  deleted,
  createdDate,
  lastStatus
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  firstName
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  lastName
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  lastStatus
);
ALTER TABLE CO_Lead ADD INDEX (
  createdDate
);
share|improve this question
    
Are there Nulls in the leadID column? –  ypercube Nov 29 '12 at 20:35
    
No, leadId is the primary key (auto-increment) –  Redzarf Nov 29 '12 at 20:36
    
Can you add the table definition? –  ypercube Nov 29 '12 at 20:36
    
Table definition added. –  Redzarf Nov 29 '12 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Notes:

  1. If leadId cannot be NULL, then change the COUNT(leadId) to COUNT(*). They are logically equivalent but most versions of MySQL optimizer are not so clever to identify that.
  2. Remove the two redundant callbackAfter IS NOT NULL conditions. If callbackAfter satisfies the second part, it cannot be null anyway.
  3. You could benefit from splitting the query into 6 parts and add appropriate indexes for each one - but depending on whether the conditions at the CASE are overlapping or not, you may have wrong or correct results.

A possible rewrite (mind the different format and check if this returns the same results, it may not!)

SELECT
    cnt1 AS "Unused"
  , cnt2 AS "Max Attempts Reached"
  , cnt3 AS "Call Back After 7 Days"
  , cnt4 AS "Call Back Within 7 Days"
  , cnt5 AS "Call Back Within 7 Days"
  , cnt6 - (cnt1+cnt2+cnt3+cnt4+cnt5) AS "Spoke To"
FROM
  ( SELECT
      ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
          AND lastStatus IS NULL
      ) AS cnt1
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
          AND attempts > 3 AND callbackAfter IS NULL
      ) AS cnt2
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
          AND callbackAfter >  DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
      ) AS cnt3
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
          AND callbackAfter <= DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
      ) AS cnt4
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
          AND archived = 0
      ) AS cnt5
    , ( SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM CO_Lead
        WHERE groupId = 123 AND deleted = 0
      ) AS cnt6
  ) AS tmp ;

If it does return correct results, you could add indexes to be used for each one of the subqueries:

For subquery 1: (groupId, deleted, lastStatus)

For subquery 2, 3, 4: (groupId, deleted, callbackAfter, attempts)

For subquery 5: (groupId, deleted, archived)


Another approach would be to keep the query you have (minding only notes 1 and 2 above) and add a wide covering index:

 (groupId, deleted, lastStatus, callbackAfter, attempts, archived)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @ypercube, I'd tried something similar to your query, but had missed the step of adding the extra indexes. And your other 2 points help tidy my code up. I might try the wide covering index first though and see if that makes a difference. –  Redzarf Nov 30 '12 at 9:59
    
You can also check each of the 5 subqueries to see if they are actually equivalent to the CASE expression. I would write them as equivalent but the conditions would be more complex and not sargable. –  ypercube Nov 30 '12 at 10:19

Try removing the index to see if this improves the performance.

Indexes do not necessarily improve performance, in some databases. If you have an index, MySQL will always use it. In this case, that means that it will read the index, then it will have to read data from each page. The page reads are random, rather than sequential. This random reading can reduce performance, on a query that has to read all the pages anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, unfortunately there's several things using this table and some of the queries do need the indexes, so I wouldn't be able to remove them all and removing some would probably lead to it using a less efficient index than it currently does. I can see this being worth trying for someone else though. –  Redzarf Nov 30 '12 at 10:01

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