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I have a difficulty when working with a R script. If I run this line in the command line it works perfectly

dbnasc$ano[which(dbnasc$ano>=1605 & dbnasc$ano<1610)]=1605

But if define a function with the same code in it doesn't work

#Função recode
xclass1=function(ini,fim,per){
t=seq(ini,fim,by=per)
z=length(t)
i=1
while(i<z){
  a0=t[[i]]
  a1=t[[i+1]]
  dbnasc$ano[which(dbnasc$ano>=a0 & dbnasc$ano<a1)] = a0
  i=i+1
  } 
}
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4  
Quick pointer: it's "best practice" in R to use <- instead of = when doing assignment. –  Jeff Allen Nov 29 '12 at 20:58
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(Almost) all functions should return something. Your function doesn't return anything, so no variable ever gets modified (except those variables that only exist temporarily in order to execute the function).

Try returning the variable you want to persist at the end of the function using the return() function, or you can omit return and just give the variable name:

#Função recode
xclass1=function(dbnasc, ini,fim,per){
  t=seq(ini,fim,by=per)
  z=length(t)
  i=1
  while(i<z){
    a0=t[[i]]
    a1=t[[i+1]]
    dbnasc$ano[which(dbnasc$ano>=a0 & dbnasc$ano<a1)] = a0
    i=i+1
  } 
  dbnasc
  #or `return(dbnasc)`
}

Now your function expects a variable named dbnasc as input and then returns that same variable with the modifications made during that function. You can call it using something like:

dbnasc <- xclass1(dbnasc, etc, etc)

if you want to assign the result back to the original variable.

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Thank you Jeff! I'm a beginer in R and I'm giving the first steps with functions. Your solution worked very well. –  Antero Ferreira Nov 29 '12 at 22:17
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If I understand correctly, you are trying to recode an integer variable that represents a year. The required transformation is turning intervals of years into a single year. E.g. if you'd have the years c(1988, 1993, 1997, 1999), group them by decade into c(1980, 1990, 1990, 1990). If this indeed is what you desire, there's an easier method:

year.recoded <- year - year %% interval

An example in the console:

> x <- c(1988, 1993, 1997, 1999)
> x - x %% 10
[1] 1980 1990 1990 1990
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Thank you Alexander! I'm a beginer in R and I'm surprised with its flexibility... I will try also this solution, but I was trying to build my first function and Jeff's answer worked very well. –  Antero Ferreira Nov 29 '12 at 22:19
    
These are called vectorized operators; it is applied to the whole vector, without the need for iterating through it. The advantages of vectorized operators are more concise code and (much) improved processing speed. –  Alexander Vos de Wael Nov 30 '12 at 6:49
    
Hi Alexander, I tried your solution and it's, in fact, extraordinary! A simple command and I get all the work done. I'm becoming a R fan. Thanks for your help. –  Antero Ferreira Dec 2 '12 at 0:05
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After check Jeff's solution my function recode looks like that:

  1. DATAFRAME

    dataframe

  2. xclass11 function to recode year from datanasc giving first, last and interval.


#Função recode
xclass11=function(ini,fim,per){
t=seq(ini,fim,by=per)
z=length(t)
i=1
ano=as.numeric(format(as.Date(dbnasc$datanasc), "%Y"))
while(i<z){
  a0=t[[i]]
  a1=t[[i+1]]
  ano[which(ano>=a0 & ano<a1)]=a0
  i=i+1
  } 
dbnasc=cbind(dbnasc,ano)
return(dbnasc)
}

To use the function

dbnasc=xclass11(1600,1900,25)

Thank you Jeff and Alexander.

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