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I think I'm having a basic understanding problem here and I hope someone can explain this to me.

Lets say we have a stateful EJB_A and a stateful EJB_B and a sessionscoped ManagedbeanA:

@Stateful
@LocalBean
public class EJB_A {
}

@Stateful
@LocalBean
public class EJB_B {
  @EJB
  EJB_A ejb;
}
@ManagedBean
@SessionScoped
public class ManagedBeanA {
   @EJB
   EJB_A ejb;
}

In the ManagedBeanA, the EJB_A is created. Now when I use the EJB_B, which has the EJB_A as a property, a new instance of the EJB_A is created within the EJB_B. It is not the same instance of EJB_A that was created in the ManagedBeanA before.

I don't understand that, because I thought the whole point of stateful EJBs is, that for each client only one instance is created and shared and managed by the EJB-Container. Can someone please explain this to me? And please also explain how I can achieve that the same instance of an EJB is shared by multiple other EJBs?

Thank you

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When you say "Now when I use the EJB_B" what do you mean by that? How did you verify it is not the same instance? – Roland Tiefenbrunner Nov 30 '12 at 7:50
    
When I instianciate EJB_B and look ate the properties (e.g. a string-property) of EJB_A, the properties of the EJB_A bean are different from the properties of the EJB_A that was instanciated by the managed bean. – user1727072 Nov 30 '12 at 8:34
    
Where do you 'instanciate' EJB_B; within another ManagedBean or a Java Client (remote lookup)? – Roland Tiefenbrunner Nov 30 '12 at 8:54
    
It doesn't matter where the EJB_B is instanciated. It never works I tried it all. – user1727072 Nov 30 '12 at 9:00
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, you mixed up different concepts, and different APIS too... I'd rather use @Inject over @EJB and specify the scope of the injected instance..

@Stateful
@LocalBean
public class EJB_A {
}

@Stateful
@LocalBean
public class EJB_B {
  @Inject @SessionScoped
  EJB_A ejb;
}
@ManagedBean
@SessionScoped
public class ManagedBeanA {
   @Inject @SessionScoped
   EJB_A ejb;
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you explain why i should use @Inject instead of @EJB? – user1727072 Nov 30 '12 at 16:48
1  
Well, an in-depth discussion of the topic is at : [link] seamframework.org/107780.lace Basically the discriminant factor is that @Inject is always aware of the scope of the injected object and that you are sure that the injected instance is a managed one (thus preventing nasty remote bean serialization problems). Using @Inject you obtain a (sometimes proxied) Managed Object, using @EJB you obtain a Resource, not much different from a simple JNDI lookup – Carlo Pellegrini Nov 30 '12 at 17:14
    
thank you that clearifies a lot for me :)! – user1727072 Dec 1 '12 at 8:00
    
I have been using EJB3.x for a while now and i finally stumbled upon this. It finally helps me "share" session bean instances across beans. without this, i found myself doing a lot of unrelated work in the same bean and it was getting slow and huge because of it. – Nicholas DiPiazza Jun 11 '14 at 18:12

I just did some reading here.

The reason is that each lookup() of an EJB 3.0 stateful session bean Remote or Local business interface results in the creation of a new bean identity. Each reference returned from the lookup refers to a different stateful session bean. It's up to the caller to determine how it wants to manage access to that reference. Typically a web application will store the reference in an HttpSession or application-wide (ServletContext) scope for subsequent access.

And:

Don't forget in your case we're dealing with 2 types of sessions: the bean session and the web session. The former ensures that once you request a stateful bean, it's identity remains the same across that user session. But when you use the latter, you have a web session on top of the bean session. To ensure that you access the same bean from 2 different JSPs (or when you do a reload), you need to store the bean's identity into the web session scope.

So you are actually right. When you want to use your instance you have to use the ManagedBean to retrieve it somewhere else, as the EJB instance is associated to this session context. So if you wanted to simplify it and be sure that the EJB just exists once per session, use CDI and annotate the EJB itself additionally with @javax.enterprise.context.SessionScoped; than you can be sure.

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thank you very helpful! – user1727072 Nov 30 '12 at 16:44

I guess I mixed up two things - @Sessionscoped and @Stateful.

The @Stateful annotation does not mean that only one instance per client is created. It just means that the @Stateful-EJB belongs to just ONE client, whereas a @Stateless-EJB can be shared by multiple clients.

So a @Stateful-EJB has a N:1 relation (N @Stateful-EJBs belong to exactly ONE client) and a @Stateless-EJB has a N:M relation (N @Stateless-EJBS belong to M clients). This means an EJB-instance can not be shared by multiple other EJB by just using the @EJB-Annotation for @Stateful EJBs.

It seems like a @Sessionscoped-Managedbean on the other hand is only created once per client.

Did I get that right?

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