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The cascade is what makes CSS special and powerful. But in the case of media queries, overlap can seem problematic.

Consider the following CSS (continuing rules for CSS media query overlap):

/* Standard - for all screens below 20em */

body { color: black; font-size: 1em; }

/* Query A - slightly wider, mobile viewport */

@media (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: 45em) {
    body { color: red; } /* supposed to be unique for this width */
}

/* Query B - everything else */

@media (min-width: 45em) {
    body { font-size: larger; } /* because viewport is bigger */
}

So when the screen is exactly 45em wide, the overlap at 45em will be treated according to the standard CSS cascade:

  • All max-width: 45em definitions will be applied first,
  • and all min-width: 45em will be applied thereafter.

Consider these two conditions:

  • All text would normally be black, but Query A is unique and has color: red.
  • Since Query B is for larger viewports, it's text has the CSS font-size: larger.

Therefore, at a width of exactly 45em, we'd get big and red text. What would be the best solution to avoid this?


I see two possibilities:

  1. Re-declare the text to have color: black in Query B, but then you're managing two declarations if you choose to change the color in the future. (Of course, not such a problem with this single line of code, but imagine there's a lot of other declarations and selectors.)

  2. Avoid overlap by using pixel values like max-width: 799px and min-width: 800px, but then you're using pixels — I guess they could be 49.9375em and 50em, respectively. Though what if the default is no longer 16em and something gets rounded? And we're still not certain what happens at that gap. (A black hole that breaks the space-time continuum?)

Both have their drawbacks... any other ideas?

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1  
You're over-analyzing: you would never write styles like that. Media queries are typically used to massage the elements for the viewport in question. There's no reason to choose number like 49.9375em as your breakpoint over 49.99999em. –  cimmanon Nov 29 '12 at 21:01
    
@cimmanon, I meant that more as a side point (feel free to ignore the weird em values, was just doing it to keep the question consistent — I considered writing the whole question in px but I prefer em) –  Baumr Nov 29 '12 at 22:38
    
@Baumr--I think cimmanon's point was that you should use your #2 solution, but set the value to 49.99999em on the max-width so that you should never have a "gap" to deal with (like you might with 49.9375em). –  ScottS Nov 30 '12 at 2:04
    
Browsers round that off when computing pixel values, so as I understand, at 50em it'll still apply both. –  Baumr Nov 30 '12 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I just thought of another option: using not to negate your media query. So, instead of this for example:

@media (max-width: 49.9375em) {
    body {
        color: red;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 50em) {
    body {
        font-size: larger;
    }
}

You would have this:

/* 
 * Note: Media Queries 3 currently requires 'not' to be followed by a
 * media type (e.g. 'all' or 'screen') for some weird reason. I honestly
 * don't believe this is intentional, so I'm hoping it'll be fixed in
 * a later revision of this spec, otherwise it's Media Queries 4.
 */
@media not all and (min-width: 50em) {
    body {
        color: red;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 50em) {
    body {
        font-size: larger;
    }
}

Interactive jsFiddle demo

This is very effective at closing the gap with dimensional media features like width and height since it essentially turns this into a black-and-white scenario. But, like your first two options, it isn't perfect:

  • You have to repeat the same media query twice, and add not to one of them. There is no if/else construct in Media Queries 3 or Conditional Rules 3 (where it probably makes more sense, since in a stylesheet we usually speak of @media rules rather than simply the media queries being used).

  • IE9 and IE10 don't implement this keyword correctly... a viewport with a width of 800px will match the media query not all and (min-width: 50em) where 1em = 16px, when it shouldn't. Old habits die hard, I guess. Needless to say, other browsers implement it correctly.

    UPDATE [3/25/2013]: for some reason I can no longer reproduce this behavior at all, so I guess using not to negate media queries that would otherwise be valid will work just fine for all browsers that support them. Regardless, media queries in general are still quite broken across all browsers, and the not keyword seems to exacerbate that.

    Anyway, I just tested on these builds of IE to confirm that the misbehavior I reported before has in fact gone away:

    • IE10 RTM on Windows RT
    • IE10 RTM on Windows 8 desktop in both IE9 and IE10 modes
    • IE10 RTM on Windows 7 in both IE9 and IE10 modes
    • IETester on Windows 7 in both IE9 and IE10 modes

Although I mention this in my answer to your previous question:

From my experiments it would seem Safari on iOS rounds all fractional pixel values to ensure that either one of max-width: 799px and min-width: 800px will match, even if the viewport is really 799.5px (which apparently matches the former).

It should be noted, still, that I've noticed some quirks when it comes to rounding. That said, I haven't been able to find a fractional value that would evade both media queries and end up not receiving styles from either set of rules (which, by the way, is the worst that can happen, so don't worry about potentially creating a space-time rift). That must mean browsers — at least, Safari as I've tested — do a reasonable job of ensuring they satisfy media queries even if you have values that differ (by exactly 1 CSS pixel).

When it comes to units with larger gaps that can be observed on desktop browsers, though, like ems, there is a much larger margin of error. For example, one comment suggests using 49.99999em instead of something more arbitrary than 49.9375em, but apparently there is a difference, at least with a default font size of 16px.

I simplified your code, changed the media queries to use decimal values, and put the code in jsFiddle:

@media (max-width: 49.9375em) {
    body {
        color: red;
    }
}

@media (min-width: 50em) {
    body {
        font-size: larger;
    }
}

If you resize the Result pane to exactly 800 pixels (the text will update to guide you along), you actually end up with different results depending on whether @media (max-width: 49.9375em) is used, or @media (max-width: 49.99999em) is used (I was surprised by this too)...

Either way, you're right: option 2 has its drawbacks too. I'm not particularly fond of it, to be honest, because I wouldn't want to crack my head over device and user agent quirks which are out of my control. If you're like me, I suppose it would be better to go through the inconvenience of redeclaring your rules at the cost (?) of being more vigilant around your code, as that's at least still within your control as an author.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! In your first paragraph, do I understand correctly: it should be fine to do what I've done in my question? Just to clarify. Also, your suggestions of re-declaring rules is an option in simple cases, no doubt, but if these queries get more complex it can be problematic for a large site (not my case at the moment). I am starting to feel that this is a limitation with the min-width and max-width usage in media queries. Perhaps a declaration like below-width and above-width might be useful in addition to this — allowing to select all values above a certain one, except it. –  Baumr Nov 30 '12 at 17:05
1  
@Baumr: Your suggestion of below-width and above-width gives me an idea, but I'm not sure if it goes with what exactly you're asking. Have a look at the edit once I'm done with it. –  BoltClock Nov 30 '12 at 17:16
    
Thanks as always Bolt! :) –  Baumr Nov 30 '12 at 17:18
1  
@Baumr: No problem. Answer updated! –  BoltClock Nov 30 '12 at 17:33
    
Wow, what a freakin' good answer! I'm considering making another account and up-voting it again ;D Thanks Bolt! –  Baumr Nov 30 '12 at 17:43

For me, the best way is to keep a gap of 0.01em:

@media (min-width: 20em) and (max-width: 44.99em) {
    body { color: red; } /* supposed to be unique for this width */
}
@media (min-width: 45em) {
    body { font-size: larger; } /* because viewport is bigger */
}

I recommend you to read this article for the details and the comparison of the different solutions to prevent media query overlapping.

Cheers, Thomas.

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