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Remove leading and trailing zeros from multidimensional list in Python

if I have a list such as:

my_list = [[1,2,0,1], [1,0,0,1]]

I want to split this at the zeros and throw them away, so that I end up with something like:

my_list = [[[1, 2], [1]], [[1],[1]]]

Any help much appreciated.

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marked as duplicate by Marcin, Ashwini Chaudhary, corsiKa, bensiu, ekhumoro Nov 30 '12 at 2:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What have you tried? –  Marcin Nov 29 '12 at 20:45
    
Not sure why this is being downvoted so heavily... –  samoz Nov 29 '12 at 20:47
4  
this is your 3rd question in a row, and in each of those you didn't seem to have tried anything yourself. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 29 '12 at 20:48
    
What problem are you having? –  John La Rooy Nov 29 '12 at 20:53
2  
This is very straight forward, if you looked at the answer to one of your other questions that uses itertools.groupby(). –  Akavall Nov 29 '12 at 20:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Divide an conquer, you can use a list comprehension to transform it to a simpler problem

def split_a_list_at_zeros(L):
    ...
    return the_split_list

my_list = [split_a_list_at_zeros(item) for item in my_list]

and Akavall gives a great hint to split the list

from itertools import groupby
def split_a_list_at_zeros(L):
    return [list(g) for k, g in groupby(L, key=lambda x:x!=0) if k]
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Having the nested list as input is a little overly specific, but this function will split a list of numbers based on another number, using the exact same style as string.split()

def nsplit(number_list,key):
    s=''.join(map(chr,number_list))
    return [map(ord,x) for x in s.split(chr(key))]

print nsplit([1,2,0,1],0)

[[1,2],[1]]
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