Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I am sorting a matrix one row at a time in descending that is 130X130, and I want to create a new matrix where the row name is the same, but the each sorted row column names are where the data was and the data in parenthesis next to the according column name. Its kind of like creating a psuedo3D array of the dimension 130x130x2 and then condensing it into a 130x130 matrix without column names. Here's a smaller example.

Example

        A   B   C   D   
    A   14  82  18  50
    B   39  95  27  19
    C   60  40  32  15
    D   70  31  69  31

This is what I want

    A   B(82)   D(50)   C(18)   A(14)
    B   B(95)   A(39)   C(27)   D(19)
    C   A(60)   B(40)   C(32)   D(15)
    D   A(70)   C(69)   B(31)   D(31)

I hope this makes sense!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here you go:

First, recreate your data:

x <- read.table(text="
        A   B   C   D   
    A   14  82  18  50
    B   39  95  27  19
    C   60  40  32  15
    D   70  31  69  31", header=TRUE)

Two apply()s, a paste() and a matrix(), and the rest is details:

o <- apply(x, 1, order, decreasing=TRUE)
v <- apply(x, 1, sort, decreasing=TRUE)

matrix(paste(names(x)[o], t(v)), ncol=4, byrow=TRUE)

     [,1]   [,2]   [,3]   [,4]  
[1,] "B 82" "D 50" "C 18" "A 14"
[2,] "B 95" "A 39" "C 27" "D 19"
[3,] "A 60" "B 40" "C 32" "D 15"
[4,] "A 70" "C 69" "B 31" "D 31"

EDIT: Based on a comment by Jeff Allen, this can be further simplified to:

t(apply(x, 1, function(x){s <- order(x, decreasing=TRUE); paste(names(x)[s], x[s])}))

  [,1]   [,2]   [,3]   [,4]  
A "B 82" "D 50" "C 18" "A 14"
B "B 95" "A 39" "C 27" "D 19"
C "A 60" "B 40" "C 32" "D 15"
D "A 70" "C 69" "B 31" "D 31"

(Since this has only one apply it should be even faster.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Twice as fast as mine. – Jeff Allen Nov 29 '12 at 21:51
    
@JeffAllen Based on your comments, I have simplified it further to have a single apply – Andrie Nov 29 '12 at 21:59
    
I like the last one. You can also replace paste(...) with sprintf("%s(%d)", names(x)[s], x[s]) to match the OP's output format. – flodel Nov 30 '12 at 1:29
    
It worked! Thank you so much! – Lcat91 Dec 6 '12 at 19:06

I'm hoping someone will propose a vectorized solution, but here's one option:

sortTab <- function(tab){
    for (i in 1:nrow(tab)){
        #Get the order of the elements in the current row
        ord <- order(tab[i,], decreasing=TRUE)

        #get the associated column names and values with this ordering      
        res <- paste(colnames(tab)[ord], "(", tab[i,ord], ")", sep="")

        #assign back to the data.frame
        tab[i,] <- res

    }
    tab
}

And a test using your data:

txt <- textConnection("        A   B   C   D   
    A   14  82  18  50
    B   39  95  27  19
    C   60  40  32  15
    D   70  31  69  31")
tab <- read.table(txt)

> sortTab(tab)
      A     B     C     D
A B(82) D(50) C(18) A(14)
B B(95) A(39) C(27) D(19)
C A(60) B(40) C(32) D(15)
D A(70) C(69) B(31) D(31)
share|improve this answer
    
Upon further review, here's a discussion on the limitation I encountered with apply() which forced a for loop. stackoverflow.com/questions/2545879/…. I'm not entirely sure that would help with the performance here. Perhaps someone can suggest an improvement. – Jeff Allen Nov 29 '12 at 21:30
    
Out of interest, what limitation of apply are you referring to? – Andrie Nov 29 '12 at 21:42
    
I would have liked something like the following: apply(tab, 1, function(x){x <- paste(order(x)...)}). But without passing by reference, that's not going to work out. – Jeff Allen Nov 29 '12 at 21:47
    
Ah, I see what you mean. I've used this idea in my edited answer. – Andrie Nov 29 '12 at 22:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.