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I have a table called Subscription and another table called Client I need the gender of the Client who owns the subscription every time I make an update. Here's my update script:

    function update(item, user, request) {
    var subscriptionId = item.id;
    var subscriptionActivitiesTable = tables.getTable("SubscriptionActivity");
    var userTable = tables.getTable("User");
    var activityTable = tables.getTable("Activity");
    var userGender = userTable.where({id: item.UserId}).select('Gender').take(1).read();
    console.log(userGender);
    activityTable.where({PlanId:item.PlanId, Difficulty: item.Difficulty}).read({
         success: function(results){
             var startDate = item.StartDate;
             results.forEach(function(activity)
             {
                var testDate = new Date(startDate.getFullYear(),startDate.getMonth(), startDate.getDate());
                testDate.setDate(testDate.getDate() + activity.Sequence + (activity.Week*7));
                subscriptionActivitiesTable.insert({SubscriptionId: subscriptionId, 
                ActivityId: activity.id, ShowDate: new Date(testDate.getFullYear(), 
                    testDate.getMonth(), testDate.getDate()), CreationDate: new Date()});

             })
         }
     });

     var planWeeks = 12;//VER DE DONDE SACAMOS ESTE NUMERO
     var idealWeight = 0;
     if (userGender === "Male")
     {
        idealWeight = (21.7 * Math.pow(parseInt(item.Height)/100,2));    
     }
     else
     {
         idealWeight = (23 * Math.pow(parseInt(item.Height)/100,2));  
     }

     var metabolismoBasal = idealWeight * 0.95 * 24;
     var ADE = 0.1 * metabolismoBasal;
     var activityFactor;
     if (item.Difficulty === "Easy")
     {
         activityFactor = 1.25;
     }
     else if(item.Difficulty === "Medium")
     {
         activityFactor = 1.5;
     }
     else
     {
         activityFactor = 1.75;
     }
     var caloricRequirement = ((metabolismoBasal + ADE)*activityFactor);
     activityTable.where(function(item, caloricRequirement){
         return this.PlanId === item.PlanId && this.Type != "Sport" && 
         this.CaloricRequirementMin <= caloricRequirement && 
         this.CaloricRequirementMax >= caloricRequirement;}, item, caloricRequirement).read({
         success: function(results)
         {
             var startDate = item.StartDate;
             results.forEach(function(activity)
             {
                for (var i=0;i<planWeeks;i++)
                {
                     var testDate = new Date(startDate.getFullYear(),startDate.getMonth(), startDate.getDate());
                     testDate.setDate(testDate.getDate() + activity.Sequence + (i*7));
                     subscriptionActivitiesTable.insert({SubscriptionId: subscriptionId, 
                     ActivityId: activity.id, ShowDate: new Date(testDate.getFullYear(), 
                     testDate.getMonth(), testDate.getDate()), CreationDate: new Date()});
                }
             })
         }
     })
     request.execute();
}

I tried the code above and clientGender is undefined. As you can see I want to use the gender to set the idealWeight.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The read() method expects a function to be passed in on the success parameter - it doesn't return the result of the query like you'd think.

Try something like this instead:

function update(item, user, request) {
    var clientTable = tables.getTable("Client");
    var clientGender = 'DEFAULT';
    clientTable.where({id: item.ClientId}).select('Gender').take(1).read({
        success: function(clients) {
            if (clients.length == 0) {
                console.error('Unable to find client for id ' + item.ClientId);
            } else {
                var client = client[0];
                clientGender = client.Gender;

                // since we're inside the success function, we can continue to 
                // use the clientGender as it will reflect the correct value
                // as retrieved from the database
                console.log('INSIDE: ' + clientGender);
            }
        }
    });

    // this is going to get called while the clientTable query above is
    // still running and will most likely show a value of DEFAULT 
    console.log('OUTSIDE: ' + clientGender);

}

In this sample, the client table query is kicked off, with a callback function provided in the success parameter. When the query is finished, the callback function is called, and the resulting data is displayed to the log. Meanwhile - while the query is still running, that is - the next statement after the where/take/select/read fluent code is run, another console.log statment is executed to show the value of the clientGender field outside the read function. This code will run while the read statement is still waiting on the database. Your output should look something like this in the WAMS log:

* INSIDE: Male
* OUTSIDE: Default

Since the log shows the oldest entries at the bottom, you can see that the OUTSIDE log entry was written sometime before the INSIDE log.

If you're not used to async or functional programming, this might look weird, but as far as I've found, this is now node works. Functions nested in functions nested in functions can get kind of scary, but if you plan ahead, it probably won't be too bad :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Chris, I had thought about that but I want to use the "clientGender" variable outside of that function and using the code described by you also return undefined when using "clientGender". I edited the question and pasted the rest of the code to add more context. –  Eduardo Serra Nov 30 '12 at 15:58
1  
Yeah, this is what makes node.js different that most procedural languages as it's more like a functional language in this respect. I think the generalized problem you're having in the code above is that it's all executing at the same time, rather than sequentially as you'd like it to. I've updated my answer to show a bit more of what I mean by this. Since node.js code executes in a sort of state machine - nested functions and callbacks as continuations - you can't write traditional procedural code. You have to follow the functional/callback-based paradigm... –  Chris Koenig Dec 1 '12 at 6:24
    
Thanks Chris, I was able to get it working using a timeout function like this: setTimeout(function() {console.log('OUTSIDE: ' + userGender);}, 1000); Do you think I should insert the piece of code where I use the gender inside a timeout or should that be avoided? –  Eduardo Serra Dec 4 '12 at 16:27
1  
Man, that's tough. The timer thing makes me nervous, to tell you the truth. If it were me, and this was the only way I could get it to work, then I'd definitely use the userGender property inside the timer code. My fear is that the 1000 milliseconds might not always be the right amount of time. It could be to much, slowing down your process, or too little, giving you the occasional, and nearly impossible to debug error :-). I really suggest that you look hard at the way the async model is implemented in Node and refactor your code into that model. Best of luck! –  Chris Koenig Dec 6 '12 at 6:33

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