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It might be basic question, but could anyone explain how does this work. Below code is just example, but in real time this scenario could occur in various places. For ex: While creating DTO for complex object like Customer which has Orders property. Does Orders (=List) need to be instantiated in the constructor of the Customer or just directly assign it to the result of query or a stored procedure.

List<string> list1 = new List<string>()
{
    "One", "Two","Three"
};

List<string> list2 = new List<string>();
list2 = list1;        
foreach (var s in list2)
  Console.WriteLine(s);

List<string> list3 = list1;
if (list3 != null) //is this the only difference
{
 foreach (var s in list3)     
     Console.WriteLine(s);     
}

I tried checking the IL code but it wasn't self explanatory.

    IL_0031: stloc.0
    IL_0032: newobj instance void class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<string>::.ctor()
    IL_0037: stloc.1
    IL_0038: ldloc.0
    IL_0039: stloc.1
    IL_003a: ldloc.0
    IL_003b: stloc.2
    IL_003c: nop
    IL_003d: ldloc.1
    IL_003e: callvirt instance valuetype [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator<!0> class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<string>::GetEnumerator()
    IL_0043: stloc.s CS$5$0000

I am sorry for posting a confusing example. Below is the actual scenario

DTO:

public class CustomerBO
{
        public CustomerBO()
        {
            Orders = new List<OrderBO>(); 
        }
       List<OrderBO>() Orders { get; set;}
      //other properties of customer
}

Now in DAL layer:

objCustomer.Orders = Repository.GetAll<OrderBO>("dbo.GetOrdersList");

My question is would it be ok if I initialize Orders object in the CustomerBO constructor (or) skip it and check for null in the presentation layer.

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1  
I'm struggling to see the question here. Could you try to be more specific? –  Jon Skeet Nov 29 '12 at 21:31
    
list2 is wasteful (unless the optimizer removes it) because you allocate a new item on the heap, then disregard it and assign the variable to a previous memory address. –  Eli Gassert Nov 29 '12 at 21:31
    
Thanks for all your replies. Appreciate it. –  Sunny Nov 30 '12 at 15:54
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

list2: You first create an empty list, then you get rid of it and make list2 point to the same object as list1.

list3: It directly points to the same object as list1.

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The line: List<string> list3 = list1; isn't copying the list, it's just copying the reference to the list since the List, like all classes in C#, is a reference type. list3 isn't a new list, it's just another way of accessing the same list that you had above. That may be fine, it may not, it's hard to tell which you are expecting and which you might need in a less contrived example.

if (list3 != null) //is this the only difference

As to whether or not you need that line, that depends. If there is some code executing between the creating of the list and you using it that might possibly result in list3 being null, checking for that may be a good idea. It's hard to tell without a more "real" example. In the example given it's not needed since list3 couldn't ever be null.

Also note that there's no reason to have new List<string>() in the line List<string> list2 = new List<string>();. You're just assigning list1 to list2 right away, so you're discarding the newly created list before ever using it.

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You don't need to reassign. When you declare a variable, memory is reserved to to contain an address for the data. When you're doing an assignment like list2 = list1, you are setting the list2 reference to refer to the same memory address as list1.

If you initialize list2 first, you are just creating an object which will be reclaimed by the garbage collector without being used.

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I believe the examples below can clarify the difference between assigning a list object and creating a new list object:

var l1 = new List<string>()
{
    "One", "Two","Three"
};

var l2 = l1;
l1.SequenceEqual(l2);           // true
Object.ReferenceEquals(l1, l2); // true

var l3 = new List<string>();
foreach (var s in l1)
    l3.Add(s);
l1.SequenceEqual(l3);           // true
Object.ReferenceEquals(l1, l3); // false
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List<string> list1 = new List<string>()
{
    "One", "Two","Three"
};

Analogy: Tear a sheet of paper off of your notepad, write "this piece of paper is called 'list1'" at the top. Build a new house, put "One", "Two", and "Three" in the house, and write the address of the house on the sheet of paper.

List<string> list2 = new List<string>();

Analogy: Tear a sheet of paper off of your notepad, write "this piece of paper is called 'list2'" at the top. Build a new house and write the address of the house on the sheet of paper.

list2 = list1;      

Analogy: Erase the address from the paper called "list2", and copy the address from the paper called "list1". Both papers now hold the same address.

Implication: The building department checks everyone's papers occasionally. They go to each address on each sheet of paper, and paint a green check mark on the house they find there. Then they demolish all the houses without green check marks. The house you just created (the one whose address you overwrote on the "list2" paper) will be destroyed in the near future; nobody will ever set foot in that house, and your efforts in building it were wasted.

foreach (var s in list2)
  Console.WriteLine(s);

Analogy: Go to the address on the "list2" paper, get each item from inside the house, and print it in the newspaper (sorry, analogy breaking down!)

List<string> list3 = list1;

Analogy: Tear a sheet of paper off of your notepad, write "this piece of paper is called 'list3'" at the top. Copy the address from "list1" to this new "list3" piece of paper.

if (list3 != null) //is this the only difference
{

Analogy: check whether the "list3" paper has an address written on it. (This is not necessary in this code, by the way, since we can prove that it must have an address written on it.)

 foreach (var s in list3)     
     Console.WriteLine(s);     
}

Analogy: Go to the address on the "list3" paper, get each item from inside the house, and print it in the newspaper. Naturally, all the papers have the same address on them at this point, so you are going to the same house; you will therefore list the contents of the same house twice.

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Thanks for taking your time for providing the analogies. Appreciate it. –  Sunny Nov 30 '12 at 15:51
    
@Sundeep you're welcome. The basic idea for the analogy comes from Eric Lippert. If you don't already know his blog(s), you might want to look at it, or browse through his contributions to this site: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert and ericlippert.com and stackoverflow.com/users/88656/eric-lippert –  phoog Nov 30 '12 at 18:47
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