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Is it possible to create a custom modal message which 'blocks' the execution of the script until a user input?

For example, how can you achieve this without using the native window alert / prompt functions?

setInterval(function(){ 
     alert('Click OK to Continue');  // timing stops until user hits ok
},4000);

I know you could have your custom dialog invoke a callback function on user input, but I'm interested in being able to force this blocking behaviour

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4  
Unfortunately, no. There's no way to add your own blocking methods, for security reasons. –  Eli Gassert Nov 29 '12 at 21:45
1  
@EliGassert "Unfortunately"? Odd choice of words ;-) –  user166390 Nov 29 '12 at 21:47
    
@pst unfortunately, because it'd make life easier for webdevs to make "pretty" blocking dialogs. But I guess it is fortunate because it would be very easy to misuse :) –  Eli Gassert Nov 29 '12 at 21:48
    
What's your issue with callbacks? –  Christophe Nov 29 '12 at 21:52
1  
@pst no, pretty blocking dialogs do not exist. By using async, it is, by definition, NOT BLOCKING. It may visually block, but it is not blocking. Execution continues on in the BG. –  Eli Gassert Nov 29 '12 at 21:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it possible to create a custom modal message which 'blocks' the execution of the script until a user input?

No. There is no way to block either execution or user interaction as effectively as a native popup (since with custom popups the user is always technically capable of using developer tools to get out of it).

However, as pst says in the comments on the question, asynchronous lightboxes are not onerous, and are almost as effective at blocking user interaction as popups, so I recommend finding a library that provides lightboxes you like and running with that.

For example, how can you achieve this without using the native window alert / prompt functions?

You can't use that code to do what you say it will even with native window alert / prompt functions (see this fiddle - wait 4 seconds before closing popup). You'd need the following:

function timeoutFunction() {
    alert('Click OK to Continue');  // timing ACTUALLY stops until user hits ok
    setTimeout(timeoutFunction, 4000);
}
setTimeout(timeoutFunction,4000);

Which is something that you can't implement (precisely - see above on lightboxes) without native popups.

Even while(true) loops won't generally block as well as a popup - firefox at least has a "stop script" message that pops up after it's been going too long, and I'm fairly sure other major browsers do too.

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Well, what if one needs to override javascript assync functions? (e.g. userscript) –  Tomáš Zato Nov 26 '13 at 14:56
    
@TomášZato I'm not sure I understand what you're asking... –  Jeff Nov 27 '13 at 21:36
    
Imagine you had to override alert with custom blocking function, eg. an ajax call or something similary insane. If your life depended on it, how would you do it? –  Tomáš Zato Nov 27 '13 at 22:36
    
@TomášZato I wouldn't - alert is part of the language, which is built into browsers, so... No. Game over. –  Jeff Nov 28 '13 at 0:15
    
Well, you can override it, however you cannot replicate the blocking behavior. At least I don't know how - and that was my question. –  Tomáš Zato Nov 28 '13 at 0:17

No, you can't (at least not in a browser). Javascript APIs are mostly async. alert/prompt are exceptions. However, it's not very hard to work with async prompts and callbacks.

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This is misleading. It implies that "everything except alert" is async, which is false. Of course, while(true) { 1; } is only so (i.e. not very) fun and yields an unresponsive page .. –  user166390 Nov 29 '12 at 21:49
2  
while(true) isn't and API, it's a language construct! –  Emil Ivanov Nov 29 '12 at 21:49
2  
So pick your "Javascript API". Say, getElementById. It's not asynchronous. –  user166390 Nov 29 '12 at 21:50
    
@pst Fine, edited! –  Emil Ivanov Nov 29 '12 at 21:50
    
(I didn't down-vote, but this answer could be made to tie into the original question better.) –  user166390 Nov 29 '12 at 21:51

A bit old, but in case it helps, I've found my solution with this:

var answer = confirm("are you sure?"); if(!answer)return;

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