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I'm optimizing a page, but I can't tell the difference in results between these (the first one is obviously faster, but I'm not sure if it slows the rendering of the page a little or something):

This one will start the request ASAP, and modify the DOM on document ready:

<script>
$.ajax({
    url: '/some-url',
    success: function() {
        $(document).ready(function() {
            // do something
        });
    }
});
</script>
</body>

This one will start the request on document ready:

<script>
$(document).ready(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: '/some-url',
        success: function() {
            // do something
        }
    });
});
</script>
</body>

Which one is recommended?

share|improve this question
    
@whirlwin I'm already doing that in both cases. Or you mean after closing the tag? –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 21:57
    
No, you are already doing what I was trying to explain. –  whirlwin Nov 29 '12 at 21:59
    
If you wait for document to be ready in success does that not possbily stall the page rendering until success is done due to the single thread nature of JavaScript? –  François Wahl Nov 29 '12 at 22:03
1  
@FrançoisWahl No, the page won't "wait" for it to be ready. In success, they would be binding a new "ready" event to the document. If the document is already ready by the time success executes, the function for $(document).ready will not execute. –  Ian Nov 29 '12 at 22:06
2  
@Ian: that is just wrong. jQuery.fn.ready will always fire, even if the DOM already was ready before. –  jAndy Nov 29 '12 at 22:08
show 2 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Best practice here is to start the Ajax request as soon as possible, but start modifying the DOM only when the document is ready (DOMContentLoaded). To do that, you might use jQuerys Deferred objects which are wired up with jQuerys extended jXHR objects.

<script>
    var req      = $.ajax({}),
        docReady = jQuery.Deferred();

    $(function() {
        docReady.resolve();
    });

    $.when( req, docReady ).done(function( data ) {
        // read the returned data and modify the DOM
    });
</script>

It would be a waste of time to wait for starting the request until the DOM is ready. The XHR request has no business and interest in whats going on with the DOM.


It just makes more sense to decouple those two things entirely. If for some reason the DOM needs a very long time before its ready, you didn't waste the time to let the HTTP request run and collect its data. The other way around, if the request is very slow, you would waste time aswell. So your current snippets are like

DOM ready    
           -> XHR request    
                          -> Do something useful

Whereas my example is like

DOM ready    
XHR request
            -> Do something useful as soon as the DOM and request are ready
share|improve this answer
    
Is this the same as my first example? I didn't know about when(req).done(), it looks "more correct". –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 22:14
    
@ChocoDeveloper: well, it is somewhat close to your first example, but as you mentioned correctly, my example there is just more correct in terms of convenience. Its Pretty much starting the request and the listener for DOMContentReady simultaneously, but when the ready event fires and the request isn't finished yet, it'll still "wait" (careful, its just a callback) until the request finishes successful. –  jAndy Nov 29 '12 at 22:20
    
There are two differences between jAndy's and your code. The first is that you have yours right before </body>, so your $.ajax call starts a lot later (meaning it will finish a lot later). The second difference is that jAndy's code uses more jQuery methods to determine when the DOM is ready and the AJAX call has succeeded, and can cause more of a delay for when the success method runs (in the unlikely event that the AJAX request completes before all the binding is done). I think putting your first example on your page as soon as possible is the best solution –  Ian Nov 29 '12 at 22:22
    
I still don't see the difference though. In my first example I'm not waiting for the document to be ready to start the ajax request. The document ready part occurs inside the callback I'm passing to ajax(). And it succeeds because like you said, if the document is already ready when I do the binding, the callback is executed. –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 22:35
2  
@jAndy the new code is neat, but again it doesn't make much difference with the OP's first version. In that first snippet, only the success function (the equivalent of done()) is bound to DOM ready, not the XHR request itself, contrary to what your answer says. –  Christophe Nov 29 '12 at 23:17
show 19 more comments

Since $.ajax doesn't depend on the DOM in any way, there's no reason why you can't call it as soon as possible. In that case, I would put it in the <head> section and call it as soon as its dependent script/script files are done (meaning at least jQuery library). Firing the AJAX request sooner means the response has the ability to come back sooner - it may not be the case that it actually happens, but that's not important.

Checking to sure the DOM is ready inside of success is necessary for you, and it's the quickest way for your code to execute. Using $.when( req ).done(function () {}) creates 2 more jQuery method calls that may or may not significantly delay the execution of your success code - it will delay it, but it will probably be insignificant.

Also, your example where you use document.ready in your success method creates the possibility that the DOM is ready and can execute immediately (in the case that the AJAX request completes before the DOM is fully loaded, which I wouldn't expect). In jAndy's example where document.ready runs immediately after $.ajax, it guarantees that it will bind an event handler for the document being ready...which means it has to be stored (causing the DOM to be ready later) and then looked up later when the event occurs, and executed. Again, the difference is possibility vs. guarantee...and all is probably insignificant (as long as you don't use your second example).

share|improve this answer
    
Are you 100% sure it's ok to execute something before the end of the body? I understand I'm only doing bindings, but I thought this was kind of a no brainer, a golden rule. –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 22:50
    
@ChocoDeveloper I'm not sure I understand. Are you asking if it's okay to run Javascript anywhere just before </body>? Javascript can be run anywhere in the head and body, I believe. But of course, a DOM element cannot be manipulated until it is ready (which is immediately after it is parsed on the page). Putting things at the end of the body is an organizational way of making sure all of the elements in the body are ready and keeps all Javascript code together. –  Ian Nov 29 '12 at 22:54
    
Yes I always read that for optimization (not just organization), you have to put all your js right before </body>, never in the middle of the body, or in the head. Not sure exactly why. –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 22:57
    
So I think the reason for that is because Javascript blocks DOM parsing/rendering. As the page is parsed from top to bottom, everything is processed. So as you go from top to bottom, you may get some HTML here, some Javascript there, and I'm not sure about CSS. But anyways, because of these little delays here and there of the Javascript executing (even if it's simply binding a function for an event), it may cause the page to not render as nicely as it could if you put all Javascript after you know all elements are ready (at the end of the body). –  Ian Nov 29 '12 at 23:00
2  
@ChocoDeveloper "you have to put all your js right before </body>" => I think this is an "old" rule to avoid blocking page rendering. Now that async coding has become the norm (AMD, ajax, deferred) it's not so true anymore. –  Christophe Nov 30 '12 at 0:50
show 1 more comment

In this simple example, both versions should do. Which one is better depends on your page and other scripts. If your script is a little more complex, and you need to pass data to the ajax-request which has to be fetched from the page, and your page is not ready at that moment - you will have an error.

Another thing is, that any script on your page will block the browser while it is processed, so a more complex code without doc-ready around it may lead to a short stop in the page-render-process. In most cases I prefer to let the browser to load all HTML, CSS and the JS - and after that start my progressive enhancement and loading of additional content.

But again - in this simple case - I don't see much of a difference.

share|improve this answer
    
What simple case? It's not real code. –  ChocoDeveloper Nov 29 '12 at 22:15
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