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The goal of the program is to make it take a phone number like 1-800Flower and make it change it into the number equivalent to a phone keypad like 1-8003569377 I can't seem to get the conversion from letter to number correct.

import java.util.Scanner;  
public class Phonekeypad 
{
  public static int getNumber (char uppercaseLetter)
  {  
     int k = 0;
     switch (uppercaseLetter) 
     {
        case 65: k = 2;
        break;
        case 66: k = 2;
        break;
        case 67: k = 2;
        break;
        case 68: k = 3;
        break;
        case 69: k = 3;
        break;
        case 70: k = 3;
        break;
        case 71: k = 4;
        break;
        case 72: k = 4;
        break;
        case 73: k = 4;
        break;
        case 74: k = 5;
        break;
        case 75: k = 5;
        break;
        case 76: k = 5;
        break;
        case 77: k = 6;
        break;
        case 78: k = 6;
        break;
        case 79: k = 6;
        break;
        case 80: k = 7;
        break;
        case 81: k = 7;
        break;
        case 82: k = 7;
        break;
        case 83: k = 7;
        break;
        case 84: k = 8;
        break;
        case 85: k = 8;
        break;
        case 86: k = 8;
        break;
        case 87: k = 9;
        break;
        case 88: k = 9;
        break;
        case 89: k = 9;
        break;
        case 90: k = 9;
        break;        
    }
     return k;
  }


public static void main(String[] args) 
{ 
     String s;
     System.out.println("Enter a string: ");
     Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
     s = input.next().toUpperCase();
     for (int i=0; i<s.length(); i++)
     {
         char c = s.charAt(i);
        // Is this a letter?
         if (Character.isLetter(c))
         { 
            int n;
            n = getNumber(c);
            char cn = 0;
            switch (n)
            {
             case 2: cn = '2';
             break;
             case 3: cn = '3';
             break;
             case 4: cn = '4';
             break;
             case 5: cn = '5';
             break;
             case 6: cn = '6';
             break;
             case 7: cn = '7';
             break;
             case 8: cn = '8';
             break;
             case 9: cn = '9';
             break;
            }
            s.replace(c, cn);
         }
     }
         System.out.println(s);
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
What is your question? –  Greg Hewgill Nov 29 '12 at 22:09
    
There seems to be a problem with it, it doesn't want to convert the char part of the number. Like if I input 1-800Flowers it gives me back 1-800FLOWERS and the output I am trying to get is 1-8009569377 Im not sure what part of my program is faulty. –  Hydryh Nov 29 '12 at 22:17
    
1-800Flower is 1-800356937 not 1-8003569377 –  dreamcrash Nov 29 '12 at 22:21
    
Once you get this sorted out post your code on codereview.stackexchange.com and see how much cleaner this function could be :) –  Jason Sperske Nov 29 '12 at 22:25
    
@user1864655 Did you manage to solve your question? –  dreamcrash Dec 1 '12 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

You need to change

   s.replace(c, cn);

to

 s = s.replace(c, cn);

Or else string s will not get change. The reason behind this is that in Java, all strings are immutable (as in they cannot change). When ever you do "change" a string what you are really doing is creating two strings and swapping their references. replace() is aware of this and rather than modifying the passed in string just returns the altered string.

share|improve this answer
    
Checkout stackoverflow.com/a/1553110/16959 if you would like a deeper understanding of why :) –  Jason Sperske Nov 29 '12 at 22:23
    
@JasonSperske Thanks for the edition. –  dreamcrash Nov 29 '12 at 22:38

Check out dreamcrash's solution. Unrelated, you could simplify some of your code by combining case statements. For example, instead of

case 65: k = 2;
break;
case 66: k = 2;
break;
case 67: k = 2;
break;

You could have

case 65:
case 66:
case 67: k = 2;
break;
share|improve this answer

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