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Should not a compiler call the destructor of the future future right after the main finishes, that is, should not be the function f() called anyway? (gcc 4.7.2 doesn't do that).

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <future>

using namespace std;

void f() {
    cout << "thread...\n";
}

int main() {
    auto future = async(&f);
    cout << "I am main\n";
}

edit: I get only Hello from main. The text thread... is NOT printed at all.

edit 2: Does the destructor of a future call wait()??

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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Should not a compiler call the destructor of the future future right after the main finishes

Right before main finishes. But yes.

that is, should not be the function f() called anyway?

No, why? What makes you think that the destructor of std::future would do that? This isn’t the destructor’s job. In fact, according to §30.6.6/9, the only function of the destructor is to release the shared state of the future and destroy *this. Nothing more.

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On my machine thread... is not printed (Ubuntu 12.10, gcc 4.7.2). –  Cartesius00 Nov 29 '12 at 22:28
1  
@Martin Yes. Why do you expect it to be printed? –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 29 '12 at 22:29
    
Oh, that means, that the function f needs not to be invoked, right? –  Cartesius00 Nov 29 '12 at 22:31
1  
@Martin: Yes. This will only happen if you actually wait for the function with either std::future::wait or std::future::get (although the latter simply calls the first). See ideone.com/22Itke –  Zeta Nov 29 '12 at 22:36
1  
IIRC, isn't it being changed so that the destructor of a future calls wait()? I'm searching for now, but I think this is the case... –  GManNickG Nov 30 '12 at 0:58
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