Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want a variadic template that simply accepts unsigned integers. However, I couldn't get the following to work.

struct Array
{
    template <typename... Sizes> // this works
    // template <unsigned... Sizes> -- this does not work (GCC 4.7.2)
    Array(Sizes... sizes)
    {
        // This causes narrowing conversion warning if signed int is supplied.
        unsigned args[] = { sizes... };
        // ...snipped...
    }
};

int main()
{
    Array arr(1, 1);
}

Any help appreciated.

EDIT: In case you're wondering, I'm trying to use variadic template to replicate the following.

struct Array
{
    Array(unsigned size1) { ... }
    Array(unsigned size1, unsigned size2) { ... }
    Array(unsigned size1, unsigned size2, unsigned size3) { ... }
    // ...
    Array(unsigned size1, unsigned size2, ..., unsigned sizeN) { ... }
};
share|improve this question
    
Please show a usage example. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 29 '12 at 22:58
    
And this arr(1, 1) would be a two dimensional array? Or an array with initial values {1, 1}? –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 29 '12 at 23:04
    
There's no syntax to take a variable number of arguments of the same type, unfortunately. :/ –  Xeo Nov 29 '12 at 23:05
    
@OlafDietsche: 2D array. –  Zach Saw Nov 29 '12 at 23:05
    
@Xeo: I am looking to replicate manually expanded Array c'tor with overloaded number of unsigned arguments (I have it up to 10 before). –  Zach Saw Nov 29 '12 at 23:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you expected that to work. Clang tells me the error is unknown type name 'Sizes' in the declaration of the constructor. Which is to be expected, since Sizes isn't a type (or rather, a template pack of types), it's a template pack of values.

It's unclear what exactly you're trying to do here. If you pass integral values in as template parameters, what are the constructor parameters supposed to be?


Update: With your new code all you need is a static_cast<unsigned>().

struct Array
{
    template <typename... Sizes> // this works
    Array(Sizes... sizes)
    {
        unsigned args[] = { static_cast<unsigned>(sizes)... };
        // ...snipped...
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to get rid of the narrowing conversion warning (from int to unsigned) without forcing the user of Array to specify Array arr(1u, 1u). –  Zach Saw Nov 29 '12 at 23:03
    
@ZachSaw: I've updated my answer with a solution to that. –  Kevin Ballard Nov 29 '12 at 23:06
    
Ah that worked! Didn't know you could do that! –  Zach Saw Nov 29 '12 at 23:11
    
@ZachSaw: The entire "thing" that has the ... after it is duplicated for each argument in the template pack. It all feels slightly magical. –  Kevin Ballard Nov 29 '12 at 23:25

If you want to accept dynamic arguments that must all be integers, you want an ordinary typename template, but check that all the types are (convertible to) unsigned integers:

#include <type_traits>

struct Array
{
    template <typename ...Args>
    explicit Array(Args ...args,
        typename std::enable_if<all_int<Args...>::value>::type * = nullptr);

    // ...
};

Now you just need the trait:

template <typename...> struct all_int;

template <> struct all_int<> : std::true_type { };

template <typename T, typename ...Rest> struct all_int<T, Rest...>
: std::integral_constant<bool,
       std::is_convertible<T, unsigned int>::value && all_int<Rest>::value>
{ }

If you prefer to make the types strict, you can also use is_same instead of is_convertible.

Another option is to forgo variadic templates entirely and make your class list-initializable by accepting a single std::initializer_list<unsigned int>, which provides considerably better numeric safety (for instance, narrowing conversions are forbidden).

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that it will error out if you pass an int type rather than convert it to unsigned. –  Pubby Nov 29 '12 at 23:10
3  
List-initialization is what prevents narrowing conversions, this is not special to std::initializer_list. Also, OP basically wants Array(unsigned... args). And it's not about them being able to convert to unsigned, it's about them already being unsigned so he doesn't get narrowing conversions in the list-initialization inside the ctor. –  Xeo Nov 29 '12 at 23:11
    
@Pubby: Isn't int convertible-to unsigned int? Maybe is_constructible is a better trait. –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '12 at 23:11
    
@Xeo: Yes, but you can't take advantage of list initialisation without initialiser lists, non? –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '12 at 23:12
    
struct X{ X(unsigned, unsigned){} }; X x{1,2}; // error (well, atleast when GCC correctly implements narrowing conversions as errors...) –  Xeo Nov 29 '12 at 23:13

Look into initializer list

You could specify it like

struct Array
{
    Array(std::initializer_list<unsigned> sizes)
    {
        for (auto i = sizes.begin(); i != sizes.end(); ++i)
            ...
    }
}

Although, usage would change to

Array arr = {1, 1};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying not to break the existing code using (). Using std::initializer_list would need me to change it to {}. –  Zach Saw Nov 29 '12 at 23:13
    
@ZachSaw Too bad, you cannot change that. Anyway, I added the change in usage to my answer. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 29 '12 at 23:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.