Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Got a little puzzle for a true Java Generics specialist... ;)

Let's say I have the following two interfaces:

interface Processor {
    void process(Foo foo);
}

interface Foo {
    Processor getProcessor();
}

and, for example, the following two implementing classes:

static class SomeProcessor implements Processor {
    static final SomeProcessor INSTANCE = new SomeProcessor();

    @Override
    public void process(Foo foo) {
        if (foo instanceof SomeFoo) { // <-- GET RID OF THIS ?
            // process ((SomeFoo) foo)
        }
    }
}

class SomeFoo implements Foo {
    @Override
    public Processor getProcessor() {
        return SomeProcessor.INSTANCE;
    }
}

Is there some way to make the two interfaces generic in such a way that I don't need the marked instanceof check in the process() function and still have the following construct work elsewhere in my code?

foo.getProcessor().process(foo);

(where, of course, I don't know what subclass of Foo I'm dealing with)

In other words: I'm looking for a way to define a function in an object such that it can only return another object that processes the type of object that contained the function. Note: I'm not just talking about processing some least common denominator super-class of the object containing the function (above: Foo), but that object's actual class (above: SomeFoo).

(This is nowhere near as trivial as it may sound unless I'm really being stupid right now...)

share|improve this question
    
if there an "else" after the "if", or is it that you only "do something" if it's a SomeFoo, otherwise no op? –  Bohemian Nov 30 '12 at 0:02
    
@Bohemian Nope, there is no else, but there are different classes implementing Processor and Foo besides SomeProcessor and SomeFoo. And each XXXProcessor will have the check if (foo instanceof XXXFoo). –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 0:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is uglier than I thought. My take:

interface Processor<F extends Foo<F>> {
    void process(F foo);
}

interface Foo<F extends Foo<F>> {
    Processor<F> getProcessor();
}

interface SomeFoo extends Foo<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    SomeProcessor getProcessor();
}

interface SomeProcessor extends Processor<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    void process(SomeFoo foo);
}

Now, the following will compile:

<F extends Foo<F>> void process(F foo) {
    foo.getProcessor().process(foo);
}

but

void process(Foo<?> foo) {
    foo.getProcessor().process(foo);
}

doesn't, because the compiler can not know that actual type of the passed foo is a subtype of its type parameter, as somebody could write:

    class Bar implements Foo<SomeFoo> { ... }

We can work around this by requiring the subtypes of foo to implement a conversion to their type parameter:

abstract class Foo<F extends Foo<F>> {
    abstract Processor<F> getProcessor();

    abstract F getThis();
}

class SomeFoo extends Foo<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    SomeFoo getThis() {
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    Processor<SomeFoo> getProcessor() {
        return new SomeProcessor();
    }
}

Now, we can write:

<F extends Foo<F>> void process(Foo<F> foo) {
    foo.getProcessor().process(foo.getThis());
}

and invoke this with

Foo<?> foo = ...;
process(foo);

To make it easy to use, I recommend moving the helper method into class Foo:

abstract class Foo<F extends Foo<F>> {
    abstract Processor<F> getProcessor();

    abstract F getThis();

    void processWith(Processor<F> p) {
        p.process(getThis());
    }
}

Update: I think newaccts updated answer shows a more elegant solution, as it does not need the recursive type bounds.

share|improve this answer
    
DUDE!!!!! I think this is it!!!! Let me try this real quick... –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 0:09
    
I think this works... But I just noticed that my real issue is one step beyond this... Got time for a little bonus-question? What would the return type have to be of a function that returns some F extends Foo such that I can pass its answer into the process function you defined? (How would a function XXX getFoo() have to look like so I can do process(getFoo()). –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 0:23
    
Figured it out! I have to wrap the two into another process()-like method to baby-step the compiler through it. You are the man! This problem took me all day to fix and THREE posts to StackOverflow: stackoverflow.com/questions/13634616/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/13633352/… –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 0:30
1  
"because the compiler is not smart enough to realize that any instance of Foo will match its type bound." because it is not true. You can make a class A implements Foo<A>, and then class B implements Foo<A>. –  newacct Nov 30 '12 at 10:14
2  
@meriton: do you agree that, given class A implements Foo<A> and class B implements Foo<A>, and foo has type B, then foo.getProcessor().process(foo); is not type-safe? Because foo.getProcessor() has type Processor<A>, and thus cannot process a B. Thus your method with argument type Foo<?> is not type-safe, since B can be passed to it. –  newacct Nov 30 '12 at 19:47

All that recursive bounds stuff is not necessary from a type safety point of view. Just something like this is sufficient:

interface Processor<F> {
    void process(F foo);
}

interface Foo<F> {
    Processor<F> getProcessor();
}

class SomeFoo implements Foo<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    SomeProcessor getProcessor() { ... }
}

class SomeProcessor implements Processor<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    void process(SomeFoo foo) { ... }
}

// in some other class:
<F extends Foo<? super F>> void process(F foo) {
    foo.getProcessor().process(foo);
}

In other words: I'm looking for a way to define a function in an object such that it can only return another object that processes the type of object that contained the function. Note: I'm not just talking about processing some least common denominator super-class of the object containing the function (above: Foo), but that object's actual class (above: SomeFoo).

That's not possible to declare in Java. Instead, as you see above, you can have a generic method outside the class (or be a static method of that class), which takes both the object and the processor, and enforces the types on both.


Update: If you want to be able to call process with any Foo, then we can integrate meriton's idea of getThis() into this code also (again, without recursive bounds):

interface Foo<F> {
    Processor<F> getProcessor();
    F getThis();
}

class SomeFoo implements Foo<SomeFoo> {
    SomeProcessor getProcessor() { ... }
    SomeFoo getThis() { return this; }
}


// in some other class:
<F> void process(Foo<F> foo) {
    foo.getProcessor().process(foo.getThis());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is indeed a little bit cleaner for the interface definitions than meriton's answer (and I would even drop the "? super" from the process-function definition) and will achieve the same thing at the point where you call the process function. But I think I still prefer meriton's solution, though, because it provides a lot more guidance already when implementing the interface. At least you will be told immediately there that Foo<String> is bogus, even though it lets you get away with SomeFoo extends Foo<SomeOtherFoo>. –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 16:38
    
@Markus: "that Foo<String> is bogus" Why is it bogus? It's just as type-safe as Foo<SomeFoo>. It's only when you use it in the process method that you care about the relationship between the types. I've just shown above that the additional bound is unnecessary, because it compiles just fine without it, without any additional casts. In Generics, you should avoid bounds that are unnecessary, and purely for "advisory" purposes. See the Comparable interface, for example, which is very analogous to your case. –  newacct Nov 30 '12 at 19:34
    
@Markus: And about the ? super, it makes it more general, while still being type-safe. Suppose you have a class SomeFoo implements Foo<SomeFoo>, and then a class Bar extends SomeFoo. Then without ? super you would not be able to use the process method with Bar, even though bar.getProcessor().process(bar); is type-safe (it would compile without any casts), since bar.getProcessor() would have type Processor<SomeFoo>, whose process method takes a SomeFoo, which bar is an instance of. This is analogous to <T extends Comparable<? super T>> bounds that you see everywhere. –  newacct Nov 30 '12 at 19:37
    
In the scenario I was trying to describe Foo<String> was intended to be bogus. Yes, type-safety-wise, you are correct that it will be just as legit as other scenarios, but I was trying to make the interface reflect the logic of the program and to move the errors as close to the actual problem-location as possible. Especially since "Bound mismatch: capture<#7 ?> doesn't match capture<#3>" in the "process()" call isn't very helpful in figuring out what's wrong (in my case the implements section of the respective class). Also, this check only works for method calls, not for returned types. –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 19:54
    
As far as ? super goes, it mostly does away with exactly what I'm trying to check for. Bar extends SomeFoo shouldn't be ok in my case either, because then the Processor returned will be mislead into believing it should process the wrong type. Imagine some rental car company treating your "reserve CompactCarWithGPS" request the same as a "reserve CompactCar" request simply because CompactCarWithGPS extends CompactCar (I know you wouldn't necessarily structure the data like this in this case, but maybe it's helpful in illustrating the point). –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 20:00

What you can do with generics is:

interface Processor<T extends Foo> {
  void process(T foo);
}

interface Foo {
  Processor<? extends Foo> getProcessor();
}

then

class SomeProcessor implements Processor<SomeFoo> {
  public void process(SomeFoo foo) {
    // TODO
  }
}

class SomeFoo implements Foo {
  public Processor<? super SomeFoo> getProcessor() {
    return processor;
  }
}

This obviously means that you need a counterpart Foo.setProcessor() with wildcards, which in turn means you end up with an unchecked cast somewhere. This is unsafe from the language perspective and there is no way to go around this.

You may check the processor instantiation with super type tokens, however this will happen at runtime, so at compile time you can't guarantee that the API is misused. Just document it the best you can.

This pastie illustrates my idea. You can't model this problem to have type safety at compile time because the Foo interface would need a way to declare that a method returns a generic type instantiated with the current interface implementation. This would break inheritance and can't be done in Java.

However with super type tokens you can check at runtime if the processor is the right type, which is always guaranteed at the language level if you clearly state in the API doc that only the processor is authorized to call setProcessor() on the Foo instance. If the client programmer disobeys and calls setProcessor() with an incorrect type, your class will still throw an exception, but at runtime.

Addendum: Why you shouldn't parameterize Foo

I feel like adding a little paragraph to explain why I don't like meriton's answer (the currently accepted one), and all other answers involving parameterizing the type Foo so that it becomes Foo<T>.

Software fails: that's not a bad or unusual thing, it just happens. The sooner it fails the better, so we can fix it and avoid losses (usually money, but really anything someone may care of). This is one compelling reason to choose Java today: since the types are checked at compile time, a whole class of bugs never reaches production.

This is where generics come in: another whole class of bugs is left out. Back to your case, someone suggests to add a type parameter to Foo so you can have type safety at compile time. Using the meriton's implementation, however, one could write illogical code that bypasses compiler checks:

class SomeFoo implements Foo<WrongFoo> {}

One may argue that it's not a compiler's job to tell if a program is semantically correct - and I agree - but a good language lets the compiler spot problems and hint solutions. Using a type parameter here is just shouting up a wise piece of software.

Instead of relying on fragile conventions, you'd better sit down, close your IDE and think how can improve your design so that client code doesn't fail. Eventually, this is the primary reason why software fails: not because a language is strongly or dynamically typed, but because developers misunderstand APIs. Using a strongly typed language is a way to prevent one type of misusages.

Your interface is very strange because it defines a getProcessor() but doesn't tell anything about who is in charge of setting the processor. If it's the very same Foo which provides its own processor, then type safety is only broken by a really dumb developer; but since it can be checked at runtime (refer to my demo with super type tokens) it can be easily guaranteed with a good development process (unit tests). The conclusion doesn't change too much if you define a setProcessor() or equivalent.

The API you are looking for is impossible to describe in Java - BTW I think the same holds true for each and every object oriented language, since it breaks a primary rule of inheritence, that parent classes don't know their children (this in turn brings polymorphism in). Using a wildcard (as I hinted in the demo) is the closest you can go using Java generics, provides type safety and is straightforward to understand.

I encourage you to only add a type parameter to the processor, and write good documentation and unit tests for your code instead of forcing the Java rules in the name of a type safety that really doesn't buy anything here.

share|improve this answer
    
That's the easy part ;) The hard part is how to define the getProcessor() function... :) But +1 for (possibly) a step in the right direction... –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:13
    
You don't need it. Since only a Processor<T1> can process T1, you are guaranteed that calling getProcessor() returns either null or a Processor<T1>. The type safety is guaranteed. Can you make an example of the bad looking API you are trying to improve? –  Raffaele Nov 29 '12 at 23:22
    
What guarantees that getProcessor() only returns null or a Processor<T1>? So far it can return any subclass of processor, but not necessarily only the one that is parametrized by the type of the object implementing getProcessor(). –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:26
    
You declare it in the SomeFoo - see the update. Inevitably you'll end up with an unchecked cast, which is insafe from the language point of view. But it's not if you clearly document your API –  Raffaele Nov 29 '12 at 23:33
    
That will cause the foo.getProcessor().process(foo); line to throw this error: The method process(capture#1-of ? extends Foo) in the type Processor<capture#1-of ? extends Foo> is not applicable for the arguments (Foo), which is the problem I'm trying to solve. –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:37

No, that's not what Java Generics were designed to do.

Also, in my opinion, the need for the type check indicates a problem with the design. I'd suggest trying to re-design it so that this is not necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure I understand... If generics are not meant for providing type-safety at compile-time rather than needing instanceof checks at run-time, then what are they meant for? –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:07
    
They provide compile-time type safety, but as indicated by the name, they are meant to be generic, i.e. to indicate the base class, not to give you specific type information about a subclass. In line with this, if you have a method in an object that takes a particular class/interface as an argument, good design dictates that you should work with that class/interface, and not inspect it for subclasses. Having to inspect the type instead of relying on the argument's type usually (but not always) indicates a design problem. –  GreyBeardedGeek Nov 29 '12 at 23:15
    
Right... That's why I'm trying to find a way to have the process() method of SomeProcessor take a SomeFoo as a parameter and still being conformant with its interface (easy, see Raffaele's answer). And then Foo needs to be made generic to ensure that getProcessor() returns something useful (that's the hard part). –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:21
    
meriton figured it out... It does work... (see above) –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 1:23
    
+1 because that's clearly a design mistake. Common code can be put in an AbstractProcessor and leave any type parameter off. I wrote an addendum to explain why virtuosic solutions don't improve the quality of the software –  Raffaele Dec 1 '12 at 22:42
interface Processor<F extends Foo<F>> {
    void process(F fooSubclass);
}

interface Foo<F extends Foo<F>> {
    Processor<F> getProcessor();
}

I haven't tested that this is precisely right, but this pattern of having the generic type refer to itself is probably about as close as you are going to get with compile-time Java generics.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried it... unfortunately it doesn't work... The foo.getProcessor().process(foo); line will throw a type or bound mismatch error. –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:11
    
But +1 for coming up with an idea that not many people know about (the self-reference). –  Markus A. Nov 29 '12 at 23:16
    
Damnit, I was worried that that would be the case. I think you're SOL. –  Steven Schlansker Nov 30 '12 at 3:58
    
Actualy, meriton had the answer... :) –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 4:05

Here's your code fully "genericized", but with one slight change: The INSTANCE variable is not static.

interface Processor<T extends Foo<T>> {
    void process(T foo);
}

interface Foo<T extends Foo<T>> {
    Processor<T> getProcessor();
}

static class SomeProcessor<T extends Foo<T>> implements Processor<T> {

    final SomeProcessor<T> INSTANCE = new SomeProcessor<T>();

    @Override
    public void process(T foo) {
        // it will only ever be a SomeFoo if T is SomeFoo
    }
}

class SomeFoo implements Foo<SomeFoo> {
    @Override
    public Processor<SomeFoo> getProcessor() {
        return new SomeProcessor<SomeFoo>().INSTANCE;
    }
}

No compiler errors or warnings.

INSTANCE was made an instance variable because class types do not make it through to static anything. If you really only wanted one INSTANCE, use the singleton pattern on the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if this does everything I was looking for... I might check it a little later, but meriton just figured it out... But +1. –  Markus A. Nov 30 '12 at 0:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.