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I came across a problem that made no sense to me but was solved by using parameters. Basically, This worked:

void Inventory:: showInventory(char input)
{
    //char input[80];
    //cin >> input;
    //char inventoryRequest[] = "i";
    //int invent = strcmp (input,inventoryRequest);
    //compare the player input to inventoryRequest (i) to see if they want to look at inventory.
    if(input == 'i')
    {
    cout<< "\nYou have " << inventory.size() << " items.\n";
    cout << "----------------Inventory----------------\n";
    cout<< "\nYour items:\n";
    for (int i= 0; i< inventory.size(); ++i)
        cout<< inventory[i] << endl;
    }
    cout << "\n-----------------------------------------\n\n\n";


}

Rather than this:

void Inventory:: showInventory()
{
         char input;
    //char input[80];
    //cin >> input;
    //char inventoryRequest[] = "i";
    //int invent = strcmp (input,inventoryRequest);
    //compare the player input to inventoryRequest (i) to see if they want to look at inventory.
    if(input == 'i')
    {
    cout<< "\nYou have " << inventory.size() << " items.\n";
    cout << "----------------Inventory----------------\n";
    cout<< "\nYour items:\n";
    for (int i= 0; i< inventory.size(); ++i)
        cout<< inventory[i] << endl;
    }
    cout << "\n-----------------------------------------\n\n\n";


}

Basically I thought this was the same. But obviously not when the first one worked and the second one didn't. Can anyone shed some light on this please.

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closed as not constructive by Luchian Grigore, Pendo826, Stefan Gehrig, Jean-François Corbett, Soner Gönül Nov 30 '12 at 9:56

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the first example, input is a parameter. It will be initialized by the callers with whatever value they choose to pass in.

In the second example, input is an uninitialized variable. Reading it before it gets assigned (as you did) is undefined behavior, because it contains garbage at the time.

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void Inventory:: showInventory(char input)

^ This allows parameter passing.

It means that you can call someInv.showInventory('s') and pass in some value to that method, and the value you passed in will be assigned to input for use in the local scope of the method.


void Inventory:: showInventory()

^ This does not; it simply declares input in the local scope of the method, but you can't assign some value to input from outside of the method.

Moreover, this actually changes the signature of the method. So calls such as someInv.showInventory('s') will fail, unless you have a method with the same name that expects a char

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2  
Both are actually in local scope. –  Lews Therin Nov 29 '12 at 23:16
    
oops, good catch on that ambiguity –  sampson-chen Nov 29 '12 at 23:22

In the first case, you would pass a char into the function when you call it: inventory.showInventory('i'). This is precisely what parameters are for. They allow you to pass some values into the function to process - exactly like the parameters of a function in mathematics.

In the second case, you have an uninitialized variable input and you attempt to compare it to 'i', resulting in undefined behaviour.

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