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How to implement atot() so it uses atof(), atoi(), or atol() according to the type? Currently it uses atof() for all types:

template<typename T>
T Mtx<T>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return atof(s);
}

Please note that speed is very important.

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4  
What about specializing? –  imreal Nov 29 '12 at 23:25
    
Why is it a member function? Do you want it to choose the function based on the type T? –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 29 '12 at 23:26
    
@Nick, I don't know what it is. If this is a solution, please post it as an answer. Thanks –  Serg Nov 29 '12 at 23:27
    
@sftrabbit, there is no special reason. I can make it static. –  Serg Nov 29 '12 at 23:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The most straight-forward solution is to specialize:

template<>
double Mtx<double>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return atof(s);
}

template<>
int Mtx<int>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return atoi(s);
}
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boost::lexical_cast<T> should do this, basically

template<typename T>
T Mtx<T>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return boost::lexical_cast<T>(s);
}

Demo:

#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

template<typename T>
T atot(const char *s)
{
    return boost::lexical_cast<T>(s);
}

int main()
{
    auto i = atot<int>("3");
    auto d = atot<double>("-INF");
    auto f = atot<double>("314e-2");
    auto ul = atot<unsigned long>("65537");
}
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lexical_cast may not fast enough compare to c function call? –  billz Nov 29 '12 at 23:43
    
@billz It may or may not. IIRC boost lexical_cast is specialized for builtin numeric types, and falls back to using stream extraction if it doesn't have such a specialization. You might want to profile this, though. –  sehe Nov 29 '12 at 23:50

Specializing is creating special implementations of the template depending on a particular type.

In this case you could do this:

template<>
float Mtx<float>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return atof(s);
}

template<>
int Mtx<int>::atot(const char *s) const
{
    return atoi(s);
}

... and so on

So if you use atot with float or with int, then the above implementations will be used. For any other type, the generic one you already have will be used.

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This doesn't compile. But it does if I replace T by float and int respectively. Is it a typo? –  Serg Nov 29 '12 at 23:52
    
Anyway, this is resolved. Many thanks. –  Serg Nov 29 '12 at 23:54
    
@Serg, yup it was a typo :) fixed it –  imreal Nov 29 '12 at 23:57

I really don't get why you want this. It seems just as easy to call the right method.

But what about something like the following?

void atot(const char *s, float& result)
{
    result = atof(s);
}

void atot(const char *s, long& result)
{
    result = atol(s);
}

void atot(const char *s, int& result)
{
    result = atoi(s);
}
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You can overload a function, if the type appears in one of the parameters. So you'll need an out parameter instead of the return value:

void atonum(const char*, int&);
void atonum(const char*, long&);
void atonum(const char*, float&);

If you don't like this, you can use template specialization. See other answers about this.

Or you can combine the overload with a wrapper template:

template<typename T> void atonum(const char* a)
{
    T tmp;
    atonum(a, tmp);
    return tmp;
}

But that's still as ugly to call as the specialized templates.

You can get a nicer syntax, for the caller, by overloading type conversion operators. Proof of concept:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
struct atonum
{
    atonum(const char* a):m_a(a){}
    operator int(){printf("int\n"); return atoi(m_a);}
    operator long(){printf("long\n"); return atol(m_a);}
    operator float(){printf("float\n"); return atof(m_a);}
private:
    const char* m_a;
};
int main(int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    int i = atonum("1");
    long l = atonum("2");
    float f = atonum("3.0");
    return i+l+f;
}
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