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Sorry I'm a newb, and I'm struggling with this,

I want to first allocate enough memory to hold 3 strings plus an integer

char *final;
char string1[256];
char string2[256];
char string3[256];
int myNum, mySize= 0;

// populate values
...

mySize += strlen(string1) + strlen(string2) + strlen(string3);

final = malloc(mySize);

sprintf(final, "%s = %s{%s:%d}", string1, string2, string3, myNum);

The integer could be something as large as 90,000 so how do I know how much to allocate for the integer? Sorry, if it's simple,

I've just realized I need to allocate +1 for the null pointer, and for the =, {, etc. symbols

Thanks!

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1  
You could just count. The extra punctuation takes 6 characters. An int will take 10 characters at most if it is 32-bits. One more for the zero terminator. Add 256, a nice round number, if you don't want to be bitten by minor maintenance edits for a while. –  Hans Passant Nov 29 '12 at 23:30
    
I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. Do you want a string to be able to hold the numeric representation of some number up to 90,000? Or are you trying to malloc an integer pointer? –  xyzjace Nov 29 '12 at 23:30
    
@xyzjace I am trying to allocate the space that it would take for "90000" to be printed as a string (in this case it would be +5) –  SSH This Nov 29 '12 at 23:32
1  
string1 ... string3 are all uninitalised. calling strlen() on them is asking for trouble. BTW: generally, snprintf() is the answer. –  wildplasser Nov 29 '12 at 23:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are printing an integer value as a string.

Create another character array to hold the string-conversion of the integer, then sum.

Don't forget you need one more byte to hold the trailing NULL character, '\0', to terminate a string. It would be a worthwhile exercise to read up on the difference between character arrays and strings (ie: strings are character arrays that end with '\0' at some point in the array).

char *final;
char string1[256];
char string2[256];
char string3[256];
char numberString[256];
int myNum, mySize= 0;

// populate values
...
sprintf(numberString,"%d",myNum);

mySize = strlen(string1) + strlen(string2) + strlen(string3) + strlen(numberString) + 1;

final = malloc(mySize*sizeof(char)); //The sizeof(char) is probably overkill, but safe practise

if(final) // check for null in case malloc failed above
{
  sprintf(final, "%s = %s{%s:%d}", string1, string2, string3, myNum);
} else {
  printf("MEMORY ERROR");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, thank you, –  SSH This Nov 29 '12 at 23:35
    
No problem. Good luck! –  Dogbert Nov 29 '12 at 23:35
    
sizeof(char) is really overkill because it is always 1 in C and C++ languages (check standard) –  George Gaál Nov 30 '12 at 0:04
1  
No debate on that one. I generally do it for two key reasons though: 1) Best practise (so I don't get sloppy when working with other data types); 2) sizeof() is resolved at compile time, and not run time, so it doesn't add any bulk/overhead to my application. –  Dogbert Nov 30 '12 at 0:41
    
Ok so I have been told by someone reviewing my code that the numberString in this example is unnecessary because when calculating "mySize" I can simply add sizeof(int). I said ok and made the change since he's more experienced than myself. But I would be curious to know your reaction to this. Thanks! –  SSH This Nov 30 '12 at 17:03

The size of type integer is fixed in the byte sense, so don't worry about that unless your value can exceed the size of the maximum integer. You have a problem calling strlen on your arrays, as they are uninitialised and so strlen will be looking for a null terminating char which may or may not be set. If you want to allocate 256 bytes like this you would be better using sizeof string1 rather than strlen(string1). From what you say, it may be better to consider creating a struct with 3 char[256] arrays and an integer member for your needs and to deal with that as a non-dynamically allocated object. Your char arrays are already created in terms of space, so the malloc does nothing except allocate more space here. Are you sure this is what you want?

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