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Ok so i'm trying to return all information in a a month that preceeds the current month. I'm struggling slightly with the format and code. Here is my attempt. I can provide table structure if needed

SELECT hd.Holiday_desc,
soh.Site_Name,
FROM   holiday_details hd
WHERE TRUNC(LAST_DAY(SYSDATE), 'MM' - 1) = TRUNC(hdep.Holiday_Departure, 'MM')
       INNER JOIN holiday_departure hdep 
               ON hd.holiday_code = hdep.holiday_code
Inner join site_visited sv on hd.Holiday_Code = sv.Holiday_code
inner join site_of_holiday soh on sv.Site_code = soh.Site_code
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you want

SELECT 
  hd.Holiday_desc,
  soh.Site_Name
FROM   holiday_details hd
       INNER JOIN holiday_departure hdep 
               ON hd.holiday_code = hdep.holiday_code
       INNER JOIN site_visited sv 
               ON hd.Holiday_Code = sv.Holiday_code
       INNER JOIN site_of_holiday soh 
               ON sv.Site_code = soh.Site_code
WHERE 
  TRUNC(hdep.Holiday_Departure, 'MM') = ADD_MONTHS(TRUNC(SYSDATE, 'MM'), -1)

You'll need to learn a bit about the syntax. 'MM' - 1 is not going to work, just as having a WHERE clause in the middle of your query. :) Also, there was a comma to many just before FROM.

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Only this one is not going to work, as you do not check years –  cha Nov 30 '12 at 1:00
    
@cha What do you mean? I don't need to check years. It just needs to jump to 'last month', which this query does. ADD_MONTH is year-proof. –  GolezTrol Nov 30 '12 at 1:03
    
I did decide to trunc the date first, before subtracting a month, which seems a little safer. –  GolezTrol Nov 30 '12 at 1:05
    
I can confirm as cha said, this one did not work. "ORA-00904: "ADD_MONTH": invalid identifier". I am now confused xD –  Tom Betts Nov 30 '12 at 1:09
    
Apparently the thing is called ADD_MONTHS, with an S. :D Or are both allowed? I haven't got any Oracle at the moment, to test it with. –  GolezTrol Nov 30 '12 at 1:31
show 3 more comments

I would use the ADD_MONTHS() function and the BETWEEN operator to accomplish this:

SELECT hd.Holiday_desc,
soh.Site_Name,
FROM   holiday_details hd
WHERE hdep.Holiday_Departure BETWEEN trunc(add_months(sysdate,-1),'MM') 
                                 AND last_day(add_months(sysdate,-1)) + .99999
       INNER JOIN holiday_departure hdep 
               ON hd.holiday_code = hdep.holiday_code
Inner join site_visited sv on hd.Holiday_Code = sv.Holiday_code
inner join site_of_holiday soh on sv.Site_code = soh.Site_code;

Also, if your column hdep.Holiday_Departure is indexed you would want to avoid using the TRUNC function so you do not invalidate any indexes on this column.

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This will fail if Departure contains a time as well. In that case, this query will not include departures on the last day of the month. You can solve that by adding an extra day and take the first day of this month instead of the last day. Disadvantage of using BETWEEN is that it is inclusive, so that solution would include departure on midnight of the first day of the month. Apart from that, this query contains a number of syntax errors. –  GolezTrol Nov 30 '12 at 1:02
    
@GolezTrol It's a good point about the last full day; the Oracle RDMS always includes a time component with date type columns. Instead of using the truncated first day of the next month I normally just add .99999 to the last truncated day, which calculates to 23:59:59 of that day. –  Wolf Nov 30 '12 at 1:16
    
That's error-prone too! I'm not sure if half seconds (or even milliseconds or smaller values) are stored somewhere in that field, but I would feel safer using < 0:00:00 than <= 23:59:59. Another solution, of course, would be to truncate the field value, so the time part is skipped altogether. In that case you can use BETWEEN FirstDayOfMonth AND LastDayOfMonth. –  GolezTrol Nov 30 '12 at 1:29
    
The Oracle date datatype: "The DATE datatype stores point-in-time values (dates and times) in a table. The DATE datatype stores the year (including the century), the month, the day, the hours, the minutes, and the seconds (after midnight)." Doc It does not store milliseconds unless you use a timestamp type. If you truncate the date field any index on that column will be invalidated, unless there is a function based index on that column. –  Wolf Nov 30 '12 at 1:47
    
The convenience of BETWEEN is not for me worth the inconvenience of the + .99999. I think that "hdep.Holiday_Departure >= ... and hdep.Holiday_Departure < trunc(sysdate,'MM')" would be better. –  David Aldridge Dec 1 '12 at 12:07
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