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I am trying to add a new class to an existing class at run time (using "type(...)"). I am also trying to override that new class' __getattr__ so that I can do my own behavior on attributes that are not in the new class. For example, I have class foo, I add class "tool" and I want foo.tool.test to do something of my own. The code below works but only partly. If I explicitly call __getattr__, it works (see first print) but when I reference foo.tool.test, my overridden __getattr__ does not get called and an attrbute error is raised.

Your help is greatly appreciated.

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.NameList=[]
        # add new class to ourself
        self.tool = type('tool', (object,), {} )
        # override new class' __getattr__ with call to ourself
        setattr(self.tool, "__getattr__", self.__getattr__ )
        # add one well known test name for now
        self.NameList.append( "test" )

    # should be called by our newly added "tool" object but is only called sometimes...
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        # print( "__getattr__: %s" % attr )
        if( attr in self.NameList ):     
            return( 99 )
        raise AttributeError("--%r object has no attribute %r" % (type(self).__name__, attr))       

foo = Foo()
# access tool class attribute "test" - it should be seen by the override __getattr__
# the following works...
print( "foo.tool.__getattr__=%d" % foo.tool.__getattr__("test") )  
# but the following does not - why is this not the same as the line above???
print( "foo.tool.test=%d" % foo.tool.test )                         
share|improve this question
    
You refer to tool as a class, but also as the object. The __getattr__ will work ok on an instance of tool. eg foo.tool().test –  gnibbler Nov 30 '12 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Python looks for special methods like __getattr__ in an instance's bases __dict__s, not in the instance's __dict__.

self.tool is a class. self.tool.test, therefore, will call the __getattr__ of self.tool's class (which is object) -- this is not what we want to happen.

Instead, make self.tool an instance, whose class has a __getattr__:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.NameList=[]
        # add new class to ourself
        toolcls = type('tool', (object,), { '__getattr__' : self.__getattr__, } )
        self.tool = toolcls()
        self.NameList.append( "test" )

    # should be called by our newly added "tool" object but is only called sometimes...
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        # print("__getattr__: (%s, %s)" % (self.__class__.__name__, attr) )
        if( attr in self.NameList ):     
            return( 99 )
        raise AttributeError("--%r object has no attribute %r" % (
            type(self).__name__, attr)) 

foo = Foo()
print( "foo.tool.__getattr__=%d" % foo.tool.__getattr__("test") )
print( "foo.tool.test=%d" % foo.tool.test )    

yields

foo.tool.__getattr__=99
foo.tool.test=99

Also, beware that the above code can lead to infinite recursion if an instance of Foo is made without self.NameList being defined. See Ned Batchelder's post on this suprising pitfall.

To protect against the possibility of infinite recursion here, use

def __getattr__(self, attr):
    # print("__getattr__: (%s, %s)" % (self.__class__.__name__, attr) )
    if attr == 'NameList':
        raise AttributeError()
    if( attr in self.NameList ):     
        return( 99 )
    raise AttributeError("--%r object has no attribute %r" % (
        type(self).__name__, attr)) 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks and thanks for the explanation. I need to read it a few more times to grok it. I also got it to work by defining a class outside Foo but the end result is the same as your - yours is much more succinct and compact and self-contained. –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 3:13
    
Opps, hit return too early. Why does py use the base's dict__[__getattr] and not the instance's? And, related, why is your instantiation of toolcls that adds the getattr functionally different than mine where I did the "setattr(self.tool...) –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 3:17
    
@staggart: I wish I could find a link to documentation which explains this, but unfortunately I haven't been able to find it. That special methods are looked for in the class rather than the instance is true for new-style classes, not classic classes. With classic classes, you could put an __add__ method in an instance's __dict__ to get special behavior for x + y, but not so with new-style classes. Now you must put __add__ in the classes's __dict__. –  unutbu Nov 30 '12 at 3:29
1  
@staggart: setattr(self.tool, '__getattr__', ...) puts __getattr__ in self.tool.__dict__. Using toolcls = type('tool', ..., {'__getattr__':...}) puts __getattr__ in toolscls.__dict__. We could have written setattr(toolscls, '__getattr__', ...) just as well. But since the 3rd argument to type allows us to add stuff to toolscls.__dict__, we might as well use it. The key ingredient -- the only really necessary change I made to your code -- was to add the parentheses () which makes self.tool an instance of the class. –  unutbu Nov 30 '12 at 3:36
    
\@unutbu: it's clear I do not have a full grasp of the difference between a class and an instance in py. I think you are saying that in my version I was creating a class, not and instance of a class when I did ... = type(...). In your case, you created a class first, then instantiated an instance. In c++ land, it's 100% clear to me but in py, it's not entirely clear to me how a py class behaves. I need to chew on the subtleties therein. Thanks for the patience. –  staggart Nov 30 '12 at 3:44

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