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I have a base class with a static pointer member. When I assign that static pointer member in a derived class, that static member appears NULL when referenced from the methods of the base class.

This is not the behavior I expect. Shouldn't the static pointer member still be assigned regardless of where it is accessed from? Am I wrong about the expected behavior?

The static member is a pointer to a base class. I realize that what I am trying to achieve is probably best accomplished by static polymorphism using templates ( Static polymorphism definition and implementation ) but I still do not understand why in this scenario the pointer member itself is NULL.

Edit: the behavior is NOT demonstrated in this SSCE. What bugs or common errors would cause the behavior I describe? My actual production scenario is significantly more complicated than this, but the structure is almost exactly the same. I am literally in the VS2010 debugger observing Base::staticMember == not null, then call to Base::staticMethod(), and inside Base::staticMethod(), Base::staticMember is null. I am baffled.

#include <iostream>

class Base {
public:
    static Base *staticMember;

    static void baseMethod();
};

Base *Base::staticMember = NULL;

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void derivedMethod();
};

void Base::baseMethod() {
    // here staticMember == NULL, the unexpected behavior
    if(staticMember == NULL) {
        std::cout << "NULL";
    } else {
        std::cout << "NOT NULL";
    }
};

void Derived::derivedMethod() {
    staticMember = new Derived();
}

int main(int argc, void *argv[]) {
    Derived *derived = new Derived();
    derived->derivedMethod();
    Base::baseMethod();
}
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2  
I don't believe you're interpreting the problem properly. How do you know the pointer is NULL? –  Mark Ransom Nov 30 '12 at 2:07
1  
The code shouldn't even compile, you have several errors. –  Jesse Good Nov 30 '12 at 2:09
    
I know, sorry I made the mistake of just typing up an example to illustrate my point. I have edited my post to include an SSCE. –  taz Nov 30 '12 at 2:13
    
Not sure a SSCE that doesn't produce the problem is really a SSCE... you'll probably figure out the problem if you keep working at really reproducing it. If I had to guess, I'd guess you are hiding the staticMember. stackoverflow.com/questions/5189572/… –  Zero Nov 30 '12 at 2:22
1  
If the address is different, you are accidentally declaring another variable names staticMember. In the derived class you are setting one staticMember. This mistake often occurs when a variable has the same name in the child class as in the derived class. You could improve your encapsulation by making staticMember private in the base class, and provide a protected SetStaticMember function on the base class. The derived class calls SetStaticMember instead of dealing directly with the variable. –  Zero Nov 30 '12 at 5:15

4 Answers 4

Your compiler is clearly the problem here, and I'm not surprised since it allows both

int main(int argc, void *argv[])

and

Derived derived = new Derived();

For example, see the result in ideone. The static member should clearly not be null.

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No repro on a fixed up and simplified version of your code:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

struct Base {
    static Base* staticMember;

    static void baseMethod();
};

Base* Base::staticMember;

void Base::baseMethod() {
    std::cout << std::boolalpha << (staticMember == nullptr) << std::endl;
}

struct Derived : Base {
    void derivedMethod();
};

void Derived::derivedMethod() {
    staticMember = this;
}

int main() {
    Derived derived;
    derived.derivedMethod();

    Base::baseMethod();
}

Prints "false".

Always give a Short, Self Contained, Correct (Compilable), Example, or your question is meaningless.

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As mentioned, the SSCE works, but your prod code doesn't. If you make a change like:

void Derived::derivedMethod() 
{
    Base::staticMember = new Derived();
}

this explicitly tells the compiler what variable you are talking about, and may throw up cases where you are accidentally hiding the base member.

(I think gcc might require Base::staticMember - perhaps not in this exact case)

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried this. I have tried using Base::staticMember, Derived::staticMember, and just staticMember, all with the same results. –  taz Nov 30 '12 at 3:09
    
Then apart from logging &staticMember I'm out of ideas, except for the really annoying and patronizing "try to simplify you incredibly complex prod code into smaller logical chunks to make it easier to isolate problems". (I hate receiving that advice, but there's been more than a few times I've lost the forest for the trees). –  Zero Nov 30 '12 at 3:11

Maybe you have accidentally declared class Derived { static Base *staticMember; };

So you have two staticMembers floating around.

This is why an SSCE is useful, to keep people like me from making unfounded guesses.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't. This is described in the long comment chain. –  taz Nov 30 '12 at 5:43

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