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Assume: struct foo_t { int X,Y,Z; }. Some function take an array of struct foo_t and set some values to it; something like this:

void foo(struct foo_t *f, size_t limit, size_t *result_length)
{
   int i = 0;
   struct foo_t a;
   a.X = 5;
   //...
   struct foo_t b;
   b.X = 10;
   // ...
   struct foo_t c;
   c.X = 4;
   //...
   f[i++] = a;
   f[i++] = b; 
   f[i++] = c;
   *result_length = i;
}

and then:

struct foo_t buf[12];
struct foo_t positive[12];
struct foo_t negative[12];
size_t len;
foo(buf, sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0]), &len);
int c,positive_len,negative_len;
for(c = positive_len = negative_len = 0; c < len; c++) 
{
   if(buf[c].X < 8) 
      positive[positive_len++] = buf[c];
   else
      negative[negative_len++] = buf[c];
}

And finally:

puts("POSITIVE:");
int i;
for(i = 0; i < positive_len; i++)
   printf("%d\n", positive[i].X);
puts("NEGATIVE:");
for(i = 0; i < negative_len; i++)
   printf("%d\n", nagative[i].X);

The problem is the following: instead of getting "POSITIVE:\n4\n5", "NEGATIVE:10" I'm getting 5 and 5 and 10 isn't printed. In other words, only the last value set. Why is this happening? I've reduced significantly my code to try to get some help here because the real function is around 300 lines of code that includes database management, etc; If really needed I will post here. Before to use = operator, I'd used memcpy() to do copy of struct to my positive/negative arrays.

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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, Evgeny Kluev, hims056, Frank van Puffelen, Maerlyn Dec 1 '12 at 12:47

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Did it work before when you used memcpy? –  Xymostech Nov 30 '12 at 3:49
    
I not clear on the output you are getting. Is it POSITIVE:5\nNEGATIVE:5? –  philipvr Nov 30 '12 at 3:54
    
@Xymostech: No. –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:00
    
@philipvr: Not, I get POSITIVE:5\n5\n instead of POSITIVE:4\n5\n –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:01
    
You can debug by adding printing information as you go...it is easy — as easy as, or easier than, using a debugger to step through the code. Print values everywhere... –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 30 '12 at 4:05

4 Answers 4

You have a typo in your code:

   struct foo_t c;
   b.X = 4; // this should be c.X = 4;
   //...
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Thanks. But this code is just an example; I have typed it here in the textarea of new thread here on SO. Anyway, I'II fix it. –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:10
    
Can you fix the typos and try to run this code yourself? Other than this typo and the typo @JTA pointed out, I see nothing wrong. –  philipvr Nov 30 '12 at 4:12

You have two typos/bugs in the example above:

  1. You are not setting c

    struct foo_t c;

    b.X = 4;

  2. The variable in this printf is misspelled

    for(i = 0; i < negative_len; i++)

    printf("%d\n", nagative[i].X);

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Thanks. But this code is just an example; I have typed it here in the textarea of new thread here on SO. Anyway, I'II fix it. –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:10
    
And postive should be positive some of the time. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 30 '12 at 4:11

There were a couple errors. Some were spelling and "c" is never assigned to in your "foo" function.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <memory.h>

typedef struct foo_t
{
    int X, Y, Z;
}foo_t;

void foo(struct foo_t *f, size_t limit, size_t *result_length)
{
   int i = 0;
   struct foo_t a, b, c;
   a.X = 5;
   //...
   b.X = 10;
   // ...
   c.X = 4; // CHANGE HERE FROM "B" to "C".
   //...
   f[i++] = a;
   f[i++] = b; 
   f[i++] = c;
   *result_length = i;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{

    // CORRECTED ALL SPELLING ERRORS!!! (POSITIVE / NEGATIVE)
    struct foo_t buf[12];
    struct foo_t positive[12];
    struct foo_t negative[12];
    size_t len;
    int c, positive_len, negative_len;

    foo(buf, sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0]), &len);

    for(c = positive_len = negative_len = 0; c < len; c++) 
    {
       if(buf[c].X < 8) 
          positive[positive_len++] = buf[c];
       else
          negative[negative_len++] = buf[c];
    }

    { // <-- IGNORE THIS BADNESS
        int i;
        puts("POSITIVE:");

        for(i = 0; i < positive_len; i++)
           printf("%d\n", positive[i].X);
        puts("NEGATIVE:");
        for(i = 0; i < negative_len; i++)
           printf("%d\n", negative[i].X);
    }

    getchar();
}
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I'II edit my post. Also, What's memory.h? –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:18
    
@Jack You can ignore that. I just threw those headers in before pasting your code. –  Inisheer Nov 30 '12 at 4:19

This is an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Complete Example) generated from your code:

#include <stdio.h>

struct foo_t { int X; };

static void foo(struct foo_t *f, size_t limit, size_t *result_length)
{
   size_t i = 0;
   struct foo_t a;
   a.X = 5;
   struct foo_t b;
   b.X = 10;
   struct foo_t c;
   c.X = 4;
   if (i < limit)
       f[i++] = a;
   if (i < limit)
       f[i++] = b; 
   if (i < limit)
       f[i++] = c;
   *result_length = i;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct foo_t buf[12];
    struct foo_t positive[12];
    struct foo_t negative[12];
    size_t len;
    foo(buf, sizeof(buf)/sizeof(buf[0]), &len);
    size_t c,positive_len,negative_len;
    for (c = positive_len = negative_len = 0; c < len; c++) 
    {
        if (buf[c].X < 8) 
            positive[positive_len++] = buf[c];
        else
            negative[negative_len++] = buf[c];
    }

    puts("POSITIVE:");
    for (size_t i = 0; i < positive_len; i++)
        printf("%d\n", positive[i].X);
    puts("NEGATIVE:");
    for (size_t i = 0; i < negative_len; i++)
        printf("%d\n", negative[i].X);
}

It produces:

POSITIVE:
5
4
NEGATIVE:
10

I had to fix nagative to negative and postive to positive. I initialized c.X. I used limit to ensure no overflow (and fix the warning). I changed the various int counter variables to size_t to avoid warnings about signed vs unsigned comparisons. I eliminated the Y and Z members from the structure since they aren't used in this minimal example.

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I think that will be better if I post the real code instead of this example... –  Jack Nov 30 '12 at 4:16
2  
@Jack: if you're going to post code, post an SSCCE. You're right; you probably need to post more exactly what you're using, but you need to ensure that it is an SSCCE (not 300 lines with a database required). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 30 '12 at 4:25

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