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This is the first C++ program I have ever written and I'm having trouble understanding the order in which operands must be put in. This is for a class, but it looks like I'm not supposed to use the homework tag. Sorry if I'm doing this wrong.

This is my input

// Get DNA string

string st;
cout << "Enter the DNA sequence to be analysed: ";
cin >> st;

This seems to work ok, but I thought I would include it incase this is what I'm doing wrong.

This is what I have so far to check that the input is exclusively C,T,A, or G. It runs through the program and simply prints "Please enter a valid sequnce1, please enter a valid sequence2, ... ect. I'm sure I'm doing something very stupid, I just can't figure it out.

 // Check that the sequence is all C, T, A, G

while (i <= st.size()){
if (st[i] != 'c' && st[i] != 'C' && st[i] != 'g' && st[i] != 'G' && st[i] != 't' && st[i] != 'T' && st[i] != 'a' && st[i] != 'A');
    cout << "Please enter a valid sequence" <<
    i++;
else if (st[i] == c,C,G,t,T,a,A)
    i++;

The second half of my program is to count the number of Cs and Gs in the sequence

for (i < st.size() ; i++ ;);
for (loop <= st.size() ; loop++;)
    if (st[loop] == 'c')
    {
    count_c++;
    }
    else if (st[loop] == C)
    {
    count_c++;
    }
    else if (st[loop] == g)
    {
    count_g++;
    }
    else if (st[loop] == G);
    {
    count_g++;
    }


cout << "Number of instances of C = " << count_c;
cout << "Number of instances of G = " << count_g;

It seems like it's not looping, it will count 1 of one of the letters. How do I make it loop? I can't seem to put in endl; anywhere without getting an error back, although I know I'll need it somewhere.

Any help or tips to point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated - I've been working on this code for two days (this is embarrassing to admit).


Edit :

My sequence checker looks like this now:

while (i < st.size() ) {
if (st[i] != c && st[i] != C && st[i] != g && st[i] !=G && st[i] !=t && st[i] !=T && st[i] !=a && st[i] != A)
    cout << "Please enter a valid sequence" << "\n" << "\n";
    i++;
}

and my counter looks like this:

// Count the number of Cs and Gs

count_c = 0;
count_g = 0;

for (i = 0; i < st.size() ; i++) {
   if ((st[i] == 'c') || (st[i] == 'C'))
   count_c++;
   else if ((st[i] == 'g')|| (st[i] == 'G'));
   count_g++;
}


cout << "Number of instances of C = " << count_c;
cout << "Number of instances of G = " << count_g;
share|improve this question
4  
Your for loops are missing the first part. –  chris Nov 30 '12 at 4:38
    
This code doesnt compile, and even if it did, it doesnt do what you claim it does –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '12 at 5:06
    
I'm not claiming it does anything! I'm asking for help. It's compiling for me now, though - but it's double counting my gs, I'll edit my post in a minute. –  stringgy Nov 30 '12 at 5:11
1  
@MooingDuck, If you mean the for loops, they're valid as far as the compiler knows. loop++ is a valid boolean expression if loop isn't some class with no conversion available and the other two don't have to strictly follow declaration/assignment and incrementation. –  chris Nov 30 '12 at 5:13
    
I would probably make a map of characters to counts and run a for_each that goes through, checks if each character is in the map, and increments the appropriate counter. As a probably less efficient solution, you could make the string either upper or lower cased and use std::count for each of the four letters. For four letters once per input, the performance difference is way too negligible to care, though, so the latter would probably be a better solution. –  chris Nov 30 '12 at 5:15

3 Answers 3

Your for loop is using incorrect syntax. You want:

for (i = 0; i < st.size() ; i++) {
    ...
}

Also, you should always use < size and not <= size for indexing because indexing starts at 0 and ends at size-1.

share|improve this answer
    
I started out with that in there, but g++ gave me an error message, I deleted the i = 0 from outside the loop and put it back in it runs all the way through now. Thank you! –  stringgy Nov 30 '12 at 5:03

Let's fix both the validation and the counting at once:

bool sequencedna(const string &s, int &count_a, int &count_t, int &count_c, int &count_g)
{
    for(int i = 0; i != s.length(); i++)
    {
        /* get the character at position i and convert it to uppercase */
        char c = s[i];

        if((c == 'C') || (c == 'c'))
            count_c++;
        else if((c == 'G') || (c == 'g'))
            count_g++;
        else if((c == 'T') || (c == 't'))
            count_t++;
        else if((c == 'A') || (c == 'a'))
            count_a++;
        else
            return false; // invalid character in DNA sequence!
    }

    return true; // valid DNA sequence
}

void doit()
{
    string st;

    while(true)
    {
        cout << "Enter the DNA sequence to be analysed: ";
        cin >> st;

        int count_c = 0, count_g = 0, count_t = 0, count_a = 0;

        if(sequencedna(st, count_a, count_t, count_c, count_g))
        {
            cout << "The DNA string has been sequenced. Counts " << endl
                 << "  Adenine: " << count_a << endl
                 << "  Thymine: " << count_t << endl
                 << " Cytosine: " << count_c << endl
                 << "  Guanine: " << count_g << endl;
            return;
        }

        cout << "Invalid sequence. DNA sequences may contains only A, T, C and G." << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
missing an else? –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '12 at 5:06
    
@MooingDuck Hmm? Where do you think an else is missing? –  Nik Bougalis Nov 30 '12 at 5:09
    
The doit looks like an error, but upon further inspection, I realized what the intent is. That's weird. –  Mooing Duck Nov 30 '12 at 17:16

You should remove ";" after that if operator:

 if (st[i] != 'c' && st[i] != 'C' && st[i] != 'g' && st[i] != 'G' && st[i] != 't' && st[i] != 'T' && st[i] != 'a' && st[i] != 'A');

Now it's not doing anything.

You should use "<" instead of "<=" to avoid wrong indexing of string array (string of size "size" means that indexes are from 0 to size - 1)

while (i <= st.size())

If you already checked that symbol is not one of c,C,g,G,t,T,a,A, you don't need to check it again, so if (st[i] == c,C,G,t,T,a,A) is useless.

But even with theese corrections your code is logically wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I don't know how I kept looking past this! –  stringgy Nov 30 '12 at 5:01
1  
By the way, the notation (st[i] == c,C,G,t,T,a,A) doesn't compare st[i] with all of those characters. The comma operator is tricky... –  Nik Bougalis Nov 30 '12 at 5:07

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