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According to the javadocs "A subclass inherits all the members (fields, methods, and nested classes) from its superclass". Also, Java manipulates objects by reference So why does this subclass return the wrong value for aList[0] ? It seems each class is modifying their own array when I expect them to both modify the same array.

public class mystery {
protected List<String> aList;

public mystery() {
    aList = new ArrayList<String>();
}

public void addToArray() {
    //"foo" is successfully added to the arraylist
    aList.add("foo");
}

public void printArray() {
    System.out.println( "printArray " + aList.get(0) +"" );
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    mystery prob1 = new mystery();
    mysterySubclass prob2 = new mysterySubclass();
    //add "foo" to array
    prob1.addToArray();
    //add "bar" to array
    prob2.addToArray2();

    //expect to print "foo", works as expected
    prob1.printArray();
    //expect to print "foo", but actually prints "bar"
    prob2.printArray();
    //expect to print "foo", but actually prints "bar"
    prob2.printArray2();
}   

}

public class mysterySubclass extends mystery {

public void mysterySubclass() {}
public void addToArray2() {
    aList.add("bar");
}

public void printArray2() {
    System.out.println( "printArray2 " + super.aList.get(0) +"" );
}

}

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2  
You never call addToArray() on prob2, so how do you expect it to magically have foo somewhere in the list? Also, printArray and printArray2 do the same thing: there's a single underlying list for every instance of mysterySubclass. –  NullUserException Nov 30 '12 at 4:49
2  
This also has nothing to do with pass by reference: you aren't passing anything to any of your methods. And if you've paid attention to the article you linked to, it explicitly states Java doesn't pass anything by reference; although it passes references by value. There's a subtle but important difference between the two. –  NullUserException Nov 30 '12 at 4:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
    mystery prob1 = new mystery();
    mysterySubclass prob2 = new mysterySubclass();

Here you are creating two new objects, so they will have their own list and wont share one as you expect.

What you are looking for is:

    mystery prob1 = new mysterySubclass();
    mysterySubclass prob2 = (mysterySubclass)prob1;

Try this..

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also mark that printArray2() you are using super, but ain't required. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 5:09
    
as @Luiggi Mendoza says try using debugger and find it out yourself. And your problem has nothing to do with Pass By Reference. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 5:10
    
Doing this way you have two different references to the same object and then when you manipulate the list using methods, they both will add to the same list. –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 5:17
1  
Cool, I learn something new everyday. –  spuder Nov 30 '12 at 5:20
    
so did you get it now? –  Narendra Pathai Nov 30 '12 at 5:21

That's because you're calling prob2.addToArray2(); that would add "bar" String to the aList attribute in the prob2 variable. Take into account that they share same attributes, not the same reference to the object reference, so each prob and prob2 have their own aList attribute value. This behavior can be easily proven using a debugger.

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So it sounds like even though a child class has access to the parent's fields, it does not have the same references. so mysterySubclass gets it's own "aList" instead of referring to the parents aList object. Thanks for the help. –  spuder Nov 30 '12 at 5:14
    
@user1626687 you're welcome. Don't forget to mark the best answer with the green check (mine or @Narendra's, that's up to you). –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 30 '12 at 5:16
mystery prob1 = new mystery();
mysterySubclass prob2 = new mysterySubclass();
//add "foo" to array
prob1.addToArray();
//add "bar" to array
prob2.addToArray2();

//expect to print "foo", works as expected
prob1.printArray();
//expect to print "foo", but actually prints "bar"
prob2.printArray();
//expect to print "foo", but actually prints "bar"
prob2.printArray2();

your prob1 has aList your prob2 has aList and yes, they are different.

after 4th line => prob1.aList -- foo

after 6th line => prob2.aList -- bar

so prob2.printArray() has only "bar" to print and also prob2.printArray2() basically they do the same thing.

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