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Delete all items from a c++ std::vector

I think using begin in an iterator is messing this up since it's only iterating 26 times and skipping every 2 elements. How else can I do it?

void clearVector() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 52; i++) {
        vector.erase(vector.begin() + i);
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by jogojapan, Tom Wijsman, juanchopanza, WhozCraig, BЈовић Nov 30 '12 at 7:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
vector.clear()? –  GManNickG Nov 30 '12 at 6:39
1  
Even if you didn't find out about clear on your own, reading the documentation for erase would have been a start. -1. –  DevSolar Nov 30 '12 at 6:40
    
@jogojapan: That question isn't an exact duplicate. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 30 '12 at 7:02
    
@MarceloCantos The OP wants to remove all elements from a vector, suggests a method that doesn't work and asks "how else can I do it". How is this not equivalent to asking "how to delete all items from a vector"? –  jogojapan Nov 30 '12 at 7:05
    
@jogojapan: Having equivalent titles doesn't make the questions identical. The other question exhibits a different type of misunderstanding, and has an additional aspect — wanting to retain the objects after removal. Those factors warrant a different response to what this question needs. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 30 '12 at 7:08

4 Answers 4

std::vector has a clear member, you know:

void clearVector() {
    vector.clear();
}

Anyway, since you're erasing from the left the size will be shrinking also. This works the way you intend, although it is inefficient because it will have to do O(N) copies towards the front each iteration.

void clearVector() {
    for (int i = 0; i < 52; i++) {
        vector.erase(vector.begin());
    }
}
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You call the std::vector::clear() method:

myVector.clear();

where I have changed the instance name from vector to myVector. It is not a good idea to use the name of a class for an instance.

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      vec.erase(vec.begin() /* first you want delete */, 
                vec.begin() + vec.size() /* 1 beyond the last you want to delete */);
      // or if you have to erase all elements:
      vec.clear();

so you don't need to iterate.

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1  
Why not vec.end()? –  GManNickG Nov 30 '12 at 7:03
    
just to stress it deletes a range, if last = vec.end(), better to use directly vec.clear(). I've just chosen a "special" range, i.e. all the elements, maybe I should write just N instead –  ShinTakezou Nov 30 '12 at 7:14

You can use std::vector::clear() to clear elements or swap with an empty container is much faster.

vec.clear(); 

or

std::vector<DataType>().swap(vec);

Note: your variable vector is not good variable name, better change it to something else.

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In C++11, std::vector has a method shrink_to_fit that makes the "swap-with-copy" (or "swap-with-empty") trick obsolete. You can now write vec.clear(); vec.shrink_to_fit(); to erase all elements of the vector and decrease its capacity as well. –  Luc Touraille Nov 30 '12 at 10:05

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