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I have below lines in my shell script.

#!/bin/bash

counter=0
counter=$((counter+1))
echo $counter

And I need to run the above shell script like this-

sh -x test.sh

Whenever I try to run the above script, I awlays get error as -

`counter=$' unexpected

Any suggestions what changed I need to make there?

Updated Script:

#!/bin/bash

counter=0
counter=$(($counter+1))
echo $counter
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try:

#!/bin/sh

counter=0
counter=`expr $counter + 1`
echo $counter

$ sh -x test.sh

+ counter=0
++ expr + 1
+ counter=1
+ echo 1
1
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Thanks sudo for the suggestions. Can you tell me how you ran the above script? You executed the script like this sh -x test.sh ? As I have already tried that and it gives me the same error. :( –  AKIWEB Nov 30 '12 at 8:58
    
Either bash -x test.sh or sh -x test.sh should work, what platform are you on? Post bash --version.. –  iiSeymour Nov 30 '12 at 9:00
    
With the bash it's working but not with sh. How can I make that work with sh. Any idea? –  AKIWEB Nov 30 '12 at 9:02
    
bash-3.00$ bash --version GNU bash, version 3.00.16(1)-release (i386-pc-solaris2.10) Copyright (C) 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc. –  AKIWEB Nov 30 '12 at 9:03

Try using bash instead of sh since $(( ... )) isn't standard.

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Looks like you have an older version of sh. Try using following script:

#!/bin/bash

counter=0
counter=`expr $counter + 1`
echo $counter
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I wouldn't suggest reverting to an outdated syntax.

Using sh -x test.sh is defeating your scripts's shebang #!/bin/bash. You force sh to be used as the interpreter to parse your script instead of /bin/bash. Up to Solaris 10 included, /bin/sh is the original bourne shell with pre POSIX syntax. It shouldn't be used but in legacy scripts.

You can then simply state a shell that understands your syntax, i.e. one of:

/usr/xpg4/bin/sh -x test.sh

or

/bin/bash -x test.sh

or

/bin/ksh -x test.sh

Should you really want sh -x test.sh to work as is, just switch to the POSIX mode by setting your path like this:

PATH=/usr/xpg6/bin:/usr/xpg4/bin:$PATH
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