Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what would be an opposite of split() in awk? Imagine I have array containig characters/integers.

What I've tried:

color = "#FFFF00";
printf("color original: %s\n", color);
split(color, chars, "");
joined = "";
for (i=1; i <= length(chars); i++) {
    joined = joined + chars[i];
}
printf("color joined: %s\n", joined);

however the output is:

color original: #FFFF00
color joined: 0

that is of course incorrect.

UPDATE: cool, ended up with the following code (inspired by join function present in answers):

color = "#FFFF00";
printf("color original: %s\n", color);
split(color, chars, "");
joined = "";
for (i=1; i <= length(chars); i++) {
    joined = joined "" chars[i];
}
printf("color joined: %s\n", joined);

the trick was not to use + sign when joining things back

share|improve this question
1  
A few things: the "" in joined "" chars[i] above isn't doing anything. Although the approach above will work for single characters in an array, it is not the way to do this in general. Using length() on an array like that is GNU-awk specific. Get rid of the null statements (trailing semi-colons). printf is a builtin with a synopsis of printf fmt,data, not a function so printf(stuff) does NOT do what you think it does. I'll post something simple that does what you want but in the general case. –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 15:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Knowing that the opposite of split() is join(), a mere Google Search gives me this page, which seems to contain the solution : http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/Join-Function.html . It joins all the elements of an array together, and returns the corresponding string.

['f','o','o'] => "foo"

Have fun

share|improve this answer

Here's a solution that doesn't rely on gawk or knowing the length of the array and lets you put a separator (space in this case) string between each array element if you like:

color = "#FFFF00"
printf "color original: %s\n", color
split(color, chars, "")
joined = sep = ""
for (i=1; i in chars; i++) {
    joined = joined sep chars[i]
    sep = " "     # populate sep here with whatever string you want between elements
}
printf "color joined: %s\n", joined

I also cleaned up the incorrect use of printf and the spurious semi-colons.

share|improve this answer

What you want (in your loop) is string concatenation.

share|improve this answer
    
correct, however I wasn't able to udpate my code to use it somehow, as I don't want to print directly but rather keep result in joined valiable –  Peter Butkovic Nov 30 '12 at 9:05

Using GNU awk 4.1

#!/usr/bin/awk -f
@include "join"
BEGIN {
  split("#FFFF00", chars, "")
  print join(chars, 1, length(chars), SUBSEP)
}

awk save modifications inplace

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.