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I need to determine the current year in Java as an integer. I would like to be able to use this value as a counter that I can, for example, use to run from now until a specified year in the past (i.e. my value starts at 2008, and I have a "firstYearOfData" value that is set to 1994. I can now run my process from 2008 back to 1994). I could just use java.util.Date(), but it is deprecated.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 190 down vote accepted
int year = Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR);

Not sure if this meets with the criteria of not setting up a new Calendar? (Why the opposition to doing so?)

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Upon seeing your answer, Calendar would be a fine object to use. I was looking for a one-liner and I didn't think Calendar would have that for me. Proven wrong I am! Thanks! –  karlgrz Sep 25 '08 at 22:03
    
What about concurrency, what if other thread/piece of library code changes current time? Wouldn't it be reasonable to modify it to something like: Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance(); synchronized (c) {c.setTimeInMillis(System.currentTimeMillis()); return c.get(Calendar.YEAR);} –  ycnix Dec 5 '12 at 10:19
    
This returns a different value in different versions of Android. I am comparing Android v4.1.2 with v4.2.1 . –  toobsco42 Jan 6 '13 at 8:06
    
I removed my SIM card from the phone with 4.1.2. So the network was not able to update the Date and Time on the phone. Consequently the phone was stuck in 2012. Looks like this is not a bug in 4.1.2 . –  toobsco42 Jan 9 '13 at 15:08
2  
@ycnix There's no concurrency issue with the code, so there is no need to make it more compilcated. Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR) is atomic in regards to the clock being changed externally, and doing synchronized(c) on a newly instance of a local variable would anyhow be very pointless here. –  nos May 13 at 12:46

This simplest (using Calendar, sorry) is:

 int year = Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR);

There is also the new Date and Time API JSR, as well as Joda Time

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This returns a different value in different versions of Android. I am comparing Android v4.1.2 with v4.2.1 . –  toobsco42 Jan 6 '13 at 10:09
    
@toobsco42 - try googling for 'android calendar.year bug' –  toolkit Jan 7 '13 at 16:54
    
Hey @toolkit, I have been doing some research with no luck. I was hoping for a more specific answer. –  toobsco42 Jan 7 '13 at 17:20
    
I removed my SIM card from the phone with 4.1.2. So the network was not able to update the Date and Time on the phone. Consequently the phone was stuck in 2012. Looks like this is not a bug in 4.1.2 . –  toobsco42 Jan 9 '13 at 22:22

The easiest way is to get the year from Calendar.

// year is stored as a static member
int year = Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR);
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Calendar.YEAR is not the current year. –  toolkit Sep 25 '08 at 22:00
    
Calendar.YEAR is defined thus... public final static int YEAR = 1; –  cagcowboy Sep 25 '08 at 22:01
1  
The get() API on Calendar gets the datum that is at the field specified by the constant. The year is located in the 1's field in the Calendar object! Calendar.getInstance() is getting the current date. java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/… –  Bob King Sep 25 '08 at 22:08
    
This returns a different value in different versions of Android. I am comparing Android v4.1.2 with v4.2.1 . –  toobsco42 Jan 6 '13 at 10:09
    
I removed my SIM card from the phone with 4.1.2. So the network was not able to update the Date and Time on the phone. Consequently the phone was stuck in 2012. Looks like this is not a bug in 4.1.2 . –  toobsco42 Jan 9 '13 at 22:21

If you want the year of any date object, I used the following method:

public static int getYearFromDate(Date date) {
    int result = -1;
    if (date != null) {
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.setTime(date);
        result = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
    }
    return result;
}
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If your application is making heavy use of Date and Calendar objects, you really should use Joda Time, because java.util.Date is mutable. java.util.Calendar has performance problems when its fields get updated, and is clunky for datetime arithmetic.

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You can do the whole thing using Integer math without needing to instantiate a calendar:

return (System.currentTimeMillis()/1000/3600/24/365.25 +1970);

May be off for an hour or two at new year but I don't get the impression that is an issue?

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Hope you'll never touch the code of any alarms. –  berezovskiy Sep 2 at 14:34
    
are you working for apple, perhaps? macworld.com/article/2023580/… –  noah1989 Sep 8 at 1:27

I use special functions in my library to work with days/month/year ints -

int[] int_dmy( long timestamp ) // remember month is [0..11] !!!
{
  Calendar cal = new GregorianCalendar(); cal.setTimeInMillis( timestamp );
  return new int[] { 
    cal.get( Calendar.DATE ), cal.get( Calendar.MONTH ), cal.get( Calendar.YEAR )
  };
};


int[] int_dmy( Date d ) { 
 ...
}
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