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I'm trying to create a method that does intersection of two arrays with repetition.

Example: {1,2,5,4,1,3} and {1,2,1} -> {1,1,2}.

I have a method that does intersection but without repetition.

  public int[] findSameElements(int[] p1, int[] p2) {
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < p1.length; i++) {
      for (int j = 0; j < p2.length; j++) {
        if (p1[i] == p2[j]) {
          count++;
          break;
        }
      }
    }

    int[] result = new int[count];
    count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < p1.length; i++) {
      for (int j = 0; j < p2.length; j++) {
        if (p1[i] == p2[j]) {
          result[count++] = p1[i];
          break;
        }
      }
    }

    return result;
  }

How can I add repetitions without using Arrays.* or List.*?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried executing that code? It's working fine for me. It's returning {1, 2, 1}. I guess you want this only? – Rohit Jain Nov 30 '12 at 9:07
    
Are you sure, it's not working for me. – Alex Nov 30 '12 at 9:10
    
It might not be working because in your first for loop, you have used p1b instead of p1. -> for (int i = 0; i < p1b.length; i++). Here. p1b.length should be p1.length. – Rohit Jain Nov 30 '12 at 9:11
    
@RohitJain: It is not the issue - but the test case does not demionstrate it. try running with {1,2,5,4,1,3,1} and {1,2,1} and see what happens. (it yields 1 3 times) – amit Nov 30 '12 at 9:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Please try following function:

public int[] findSameElements(int[] p1, int[] p2)
{
    int count = 0;
    bool[] choosen = new bool[p2.length];

    for (int i = 0; i < p1.length; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < p2.length; j++)
        {
            if (!choosen[j] && p1[i] == p2[j])
            {
                choosen[j] = true;
                count++;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    int[] result = new int[count];
    count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < p2.length; i++)
    {
        if (choosen[i])
        {
            result[count] = p2[i];
            count++;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

If necessary you also should apply sorting, this solution has O(N^2) complexity. Also possible made O(NLogN) complexity.

share|improve this answer

You can build a histogram (will be represented as a Map<Integer,Integer>) and:

  1. Insert all elements (and the number of their repeats) from list1 to the histogram
  2. Iterate list2 for each element e:
    - if the histogram contains the element e (with positive value): print (or append to a new list) e, and decrease the value for e in the histogram

Note that this solution is O(n+m) time (average case) and O(min{n,m}) space.


Code sample (using List<T> instead of an array - but it can be easily modified of course):

private static <T> Map<T,Integer>  populateHistogram(List<T> list) {
    Map<T,Integer> histogram = new HashMap<T, Integer>();
    for (T e : list) {
        Integer val = histogram.get(e);
        histogram.put(e, val == null ? 1 : val+1);
    }
    return histogram;
}
public static <T> List<T> generateInterectionList(List<T> list,Map<T,Integer> histogram ) {
    List<T> res = new ArrayList<T>();
    for (T e : list) { 
        Integer val = histogram.get(e);
        if (val != null && val > 0) { 
            res.add(e);
            histogram.put(e,val - 1);
        }
    }
    return res;
}
public static <T> List<T> getIntersection(List<T> list1, List<T> list2) {
    Map<T,Integer> histogram = populateHistogram(list1.size() > list2.size() ? list2 : list1);
    return generateInterectionList(list1.size() > list2.size() ? list2 : list1,histogram);
}
public static void main(String[]args){
    List<Integer> list1 = Arrays.asList(new Integer[]{1,2,5,4,1,3}); 
    List<Integer> list2 = Arrays.asList(new Integer[]{1,2,1}); 
    System.out.println(getIntersection(list1, list2));
}

Note it can also be done in O(nlogn) time and O(logn) space (for stack trace of sorting algorithm) with sorting the lists, and then iterating in parallel with one pointer for each list

pseudo code:

Repeat while i1 < list1.length and i2 < list2.length:

  1. if list1[i1] == list2[i2]:
    - print list1[i1]
    - increase i1,i2
  2. else if list1[i1] > list2[i2]:
    - increase i2
  3. else:
    - increase i1
share|improve this answer
    
O(1)... Including "sorting" and "iterating"... How? – Anders R. Bystrup Nov 30 '12 at 18:48
    
@AndersR.Bystrup: You are correct of course, it should be O(logn) space for the stack trace of the sorting algorithm (It also does not count the output itself as extra space, it can be streamed out using a constant space at a time for the calling environment for that purpose) – amit Nov 30 '12 at 18:51

Is there a reason to not use collections? The retainAll(...) method does what you want:

List<Integer> list1 = ...
List<Integer> list2 = ...
List<Integer> intersection = list1.retainAll( list2 );
share|improve this answer

One way to do it is using hash tables. Create two separate hash tables out of the two arrays.. The key value pairs are (element,count). Now go through the smaller hash table and print out each element count_min number of times where count_min = min(count of element in table a, count of element in table b). This is a linear algorithm with an additional space complexity.

Space complexity = O(n+m) where n and m are the sizes of the two arrays. Time complexiy O(n) where n >m.

share|improve this answer

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