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Here's a snippet from my build output in Visual Studio 2010:

1>------ Build started: Project: Engine, Configuration: Release_PG Win32 ------ 1>icl : warning #10187: PGOPTI instrumentation disables multifile optimizations 1>icl : warning #10188: PGOPTI instrumentation disables IP optimizations
1> !BasketNovel.cpp 1> Compiling precompiled.h - this should happen just once per project. 1> 1> Compiling BasketNovel.h. 1>

1> Camera.cpp 1> Compiling precompiled.h - this should happen just once per project. 1> 1> Compiling BasketNovel.h. 1>

1> Console.cpp 1> Compiling precompiled.h - this should happen just once per project. 1> 1> Compiling BasketNovel.h. 1>

1> Entity.cpp 1> Compiling precompiled.h - this should happen just once per project. 1> 1> Compiling BasketNovel.h. 1>

1> Font.cpp

From what I see, the compiler's building my .cpp files in alphabetical order. I'm not really familiar with build concepts. Is this a normal behaviour?

Note: I am using the Intel C++ compiler.

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It doesn't matter. –  user1773602 Nov 30 '12 at 10:26
    
@aleguna I'm looking more for an answer that explains why this is happening and if it is indeed normal behaviour. –  dk123 Nov 30 '12 at 10:29
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It's happening just because Visual Studio developers designed the build system to work this way. It's not 'normal' or 'not normal' it's just the way it is. –  user1773602 Nov 30 '12 at 10:31
    
@aleguna Ah, I see. Thanks for the reply! –  dk123 Nov 30 '12 at 10:42
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The order of compilation is not really important. The important step that builds your end-product (executable, library, etc) is the linking step, where the pieces from the compilation step will be linked together.

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Thanks for making that point. I'll start looking more into linking concepts. –  dk123 Nov 30 '12 at 10:44
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You can examine all steps from code to end product. An example would be faculty.cs.niu.edu/~mcmahon/CS241/Notes/compile.html. Or Google 'compiler steps'. –  incrediblehulk Nov 30 '12 at 10:47
    
Thanks for the link. The diagram neatly illustrates the various concepts I was looking for. –  dk123 Nov 30 '12 at 10:54
    
btw, does this mean that if a .cpp file doesn't have it's own corresponding header file it would slow down building time? –  dk123 Nov 30 '12 at 11:11
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First, there is no such thing as 'corresponding header'. You need to explicitly #include all the headers you require. Any directive that starts with a # is handled by the pre-processor and therefore does not affect the compile time. –  incrediblehulk Nov 30 '12 at 11:46
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