Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Consider y.py:

def f():
    x = 1
    y = 2

And x.py:

from y import f
    f()
    a = x + 1
    b = y + 1

Obviously x.py won't work, since y.f() is not returning anything. So how do I handle the case where I want to copy in multiple lines from one script into some pre-determined point in another script, ultimately resutling in x.py looking like the following before it gets executed?

x = 1
y = 2
a = x + 1
b = y + 1

Note that this simple example contains just variable declarations. In actuality y.py will contain a mixture of variable declarations, flow control, classes, functions etc.

Many thanks for your helpfulness.

share|improve this question

I think you need to reconsider your program structure. You could possibly make this work via use of execfile, but it would be horrible. Python has namespaces and classes for a reason: you should use them.

share|improve this answer

What you're asking for is inlining mechanism, a macro. Python doesn't have those and for good reasons. What you're asking for most surely can be done with existing Python constructs, like functions or classes. You need to provide more of your code if we are to help.

Based on your basic example, think about how can you refactor your code from "f" function, so that "x" and "y" are separate functions (instead of local variables) that can be called independently, and that you can use in your "x.py" program. Lots of local variables is a code smell, so I would start at refactoring that into more manageable and independent elements.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.