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I just noticed magento enterprise and community both edition uses different algorithms for storing password. I know community edition uses md5. Can anyone tell me which mechanism is used in enterprise edition and how can we decrypt enterprise password if we want to migrate to community edition?

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Is their a reason you dont just reset all the password and let a customer reset their password when they want to login? –  R.S Nov 30 '12 at 12:10
1  
I have more than 5000 customers and I dont want to request all the customers. –  Palanikumar Nov 30 '12 at 12:32
2  
Thats not a good idea. Im looking for a solution. –  Palanikumar Nov 30 '12 at 12:56
1  
nah, it's the same, but the key every Magento is different. check on your <global><crypt><key> tag –  Josua Marcel Chrisano Dec 20 '12 at 3:26
    
can you green check the bounty answer? –  Josua Marcel Chrisano May 10 at 1:06

5 Answers 5

I think it's on your app/etc/local.xml or app/etc/enterprise.xml on Magento EE

The Decrypt function On Magento Enterprise Edition

/**
 * Decrypt a string
 *
 * @param string $data
 * @return string
 */
public function decrypt($data)
{
    return str_replace("\x0", '', trim($this->_getCrypt()->decrypt(base64_decode((string)$data))));
}

and

/**
 * Instantiate crypt model
 *
 * @param string $key
 * @return Varien_Crypt_Mcrypt
 */
protected function _getCrypt($key = null)
{
    if (!$this->_crypt) {
        if (null === $key) {
            $key = (string)Mage::getConfig()->getNode('global/crypt/key');
        }
        $this->_crypt = Varien_Crypt::factory()->init($key);
    }
    return $this->_crypt;
}

it seems like the same function on Enterprise Edition or Community Edition. You should ask the cript key to Magento Enterprise Edition's Owner and decrypt it with CE. It would be fine because i'm sneaking to Magento Enterprise Edition's Code and the code is the same with Community Edition (for encryption/decryption)

added after comment 1:

/**
 * Hash a string
 *
 * @param string $data
 * @return string
 */
public function hash($data)
{
    return md5($data);
}

/**
 * Validate hash against hashing method (with or without salt)
 *
 * @param string $password
 * @param string $hash
 * @return bool
 * @throws Exception
 */
public function validateHash($password, $hash)
{
    $hashArr = explode(':', $hash);
    switch (count($hashArr)) {
        case 1:
            return $this->hash($password) === $hash;
        case 2:
            return $this->hash($hashArr[1] . $password) === $hashArr[0];
    }
    Mage::throwException('Invalid hash.');
}
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1  
These are decryption routines for encrypted data which is meant to be recovered by using the encryption key in app/etc/local.xml. Passwords are stored in hashes. Please look up public function hash($data) in your Enterprise code and report back what hash routine is being used. See my post for 1.7.x.x CE code and further functions used for working with passwords. –  Fiasco Labs Dec 20 '12 at 16:12
4  
already updating my answer –  Josua Marcel Chrisano Dec 21 '12 at 2:15
4  
Thanks for the Enterprise code. Ok, they're both using MD5 then. @fkim notes in his post that Enterprise may use a salt and CE may not. I'll leave the rest up to Palanikumar as to what to make of it then. –  Fiasco Labs Dec 21 '12 at 4:05
5  
Thanks for you suggestion josua and fiasco laps. –  Palanikumar Dec 24 '12 at 6:36

Hashes are one way encryption. You're not supposed to be able to decrypt the password.

Basic operations for passwords:

  1. The customer signs up for an account and enters a password. The system adds a salt, encrypts the password and stores the resulting password hash in the database.

  2. The customer logs in, enters the password. The system adds a salt, encrypts the password and compares the generated password hash with the stored password hash. When the hashes are equal, the login system knows the customer knows the password without actually knowing the password itself.

So, if one system uses SHA1 and another uses old, expired MD5, the only way you can get the password back into the system is to have the customer reenter the password so the new hash algorithm gets invoked and the new hash gets stored.

You have the Enterprise source code, write a module that uses the Enterprise hashing function to store and compare the passwords and you'll have CE with an updated, security enhanced method to store passwords and should be able to bring the password hashes over from the old site.

Some additional information:

The encryption method used is found in the Mage_Core_Model_Encryption class.

Three functions of interest are:

  1. public function hash($data)
  2. public function getHash($password, $salt = false)
  3. public function validateHash($password, $hash)

Function Code From 1.7.x.x

>

public function hash($data)
{
    return md5($data);
}

>

public function getHash($password, $salt = false)
{
    if (is_integer($salt)) {
        $salt = $this->_helper->getRandomString($salt);
    }
    return $salt === false ? $this->hash($password) : $this->hash($salt . $password) . ':' . $salt;
}

>

public function validateHash($password, $hash)
{
    $hashArr = explode(':', $hash);
    switch (count($hashArr)) {
        case 1:
            return $this->hash($password) === $hash;
        case 2:
            return $this->hash($hashArr[1] . $password) === $hashArr[0];
    }
    Mage::throwException('Invalid hash.');
}

It appears that both CE and Enterprise use the same routines, you will have to check that out as you have the Enterprise code.

Changing the Encryption Key in your app/etc/local.xml file to match the key in your Enterprise version and then importing the Enterprise data into the CE datapbase will allow access to encrypted data. Passwords, though are stored as hashes (see above function blocks) and non-reversible due to that. The pertinent section in local.xml where the encryption key is stored:

<crypt>
    <key>< ![CDATA[-encryption-key-here-]]></key>
</crypt>
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We also moved to a different system with a different password algorithm. What we did was indeed like Fiasco suggests:

-> write a custom module that overwrites Magento_Core_Model_Encryption and change the hash function to match the algorithm of the encrypted passwords.

In your module config:

<global>
  <helpers>
    <core>
      <encryption_model>MyCompany_Module_Model_Encryption</encryption_model>
   </core>
 </helpers>
</global>
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As you note, overwrite Mage_Core_Model_Encryption and modify public function hash($data) for the right hash method. –  Fiasco Labs Dec 20 '12 at 17:34

They should both use MD5.

Perhaps one has salt and one doesn't - but it will be backwards compatible.

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1  
i think it was base64_decode –  Josua Marcel Chrisano Dec 20 '12 at 3:25
    
base64_decode is encoding, not encryption... look for password hashing routines. You'll find reference to salts in them. –  Fiasco Labs Dec 20 '12 at 16:04

I have done a successful migration from Magento Enterprise to Magento Community in the past. If the passwords are salted you will not be able to decrypt them to use them for Magento Community.

Your best option is to send out a mass newsletter saying people have to change their password OR auto generate a password for each customer and send it to them.

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You won't be able to decrypt the unsalted ones either. Hashes aren't reversible and can only be brute forced. Storing without salts makes using rainbow tables usable, but rainbow tables are databases of hashes you compare against the hashes you've extracted from the password storage database to compare against the table. –  Fiasco Labs Jan 12 '13 at 23:21

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