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I would like to know how to combine columns with duplicate headers in a file using bash/sed/awk.

   x y  x  y
s1 3 4  6 10
s2 3 9 10  7
s3 7 1  3  2

to :

    x  y
s1  9 14
s2 13 16
s3 10  3
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1  
are duplicated headers randomly located or they are always like "x y x y"? –  Kent Nov 30 '12 at 11:46
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
$ cat file
   x y  x  y
s1 3 4  6 10
s2 3 9 10  7
s3 7 1  3  2

$ cat tst.awk
NR==1 {
   for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
      flds[$i] = flds[$i] " " i+1
   }
   printf "%-3s",""
   for (hdr in flds) {
      printf "%3s",hdr
   }
   print ""
   next
}
{
   printf "%-3s",$1
   for (hdr in flds) {
      n = split(flds[hdr],fldNrs)
      sum = 0
      for (i=1; i<=n; i++) {
         sum += $(fldNrs[i])
      }
      printf "%3d",sum
   }
   print ""
}

$ awk -f tst.awk file
     x  y
s1   9 14
s2  13 16
s3  10  3

$ time awk -f ./tst.awk file
     x  y
s1   9 14
s2  13 16
s3  10  3

real    0m0.265s
user    0m0.030s
sys     0m0.108s

Adjust the printf lines in the obvious ways for different output formatting if you like.

Here's the bash equivalent in response to the comments elsethread. Do NOT use this, the awk solution is the right one, this is just to show how you should write it in bash IF you wanted to do that for some inexplicable reason:

$ cat tst.sh
declare -A flds
while IFS= read -r rec
do
   lineNr=$(( lineNr + 1 ))
   set -- $rec

   if (( lineNr == 1 ))
   then

      fldNr=1
      for fld
      do
         fldNr=$(( fldNr + 1 ))
         flds[$fld]+=" $fldNr"
      done
      printf "%-3s" ""
      for hdr in "${!flds[@]}"
      do
         printf "%3s" "$hdr"
      done
      printf "\n"

   else

      printf "%-3s" "$1"
      for hdr in "${!flds[@]}"
      do
         fldNrs=( ${flds[$hdr]} )
         sum=0
         for fldNr in "${fldNrs[@]}"
         do
            eval val="\$$fldNr"
            sum=$(( sum + val ))
         done
         printf "%3d" "$sum"
      done
      printf "\n"

   fi

done < "$1"
$
$ time ./tst.sh file
     x  y
s1   9 14
s2  13 16
s3  10  3

real    0m0.062s
user    0m0.031s
sys     0m0.046s

Note that it runs in roughly the same order of magnitude duration as the awk script (see comments elsethread). Caveat - I never write bash scripts for processing text files so I'm not claiming the above bash script is perfect, just an example of how to approach it in bash for comparison with the other script in this thread that I claimed should be rewritten!

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+1 not only for an elegant solution but also the word "elsethread". –  Adrian Frühwirth May 6 '13 at 22:13
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This not a one line. You can do it using Bash v4, Bash's dictonaries, and some shell tools.

Execute the script below with the name of the file to process a parameter

bash script_below.sh your_file

Here is the script:

declare -A coltofield
headerdone=0

# Take the first line of the input file and extract all fields 
# and their position. Start with position value 2 because of the 
# format of the following lines

while read line; do
    colnum=$(echo $line | cut -d "=" -f 1)
    field=$(echo $line | cut -d "=" -f 2)

    coltofield[$colnum]=$field
done < <(head -n 1 $1 | sed  -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//;' -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//;' -e 's/[[:space:]]\+/\n/g;' | nl -v 2 -n ln  | sed -e 's/[[:space:]]\+/=/g;')

# Read the rest of the file starting with the second line             
while read line; do
    declare -A computation
    declare varname


    # Turn the line in key value pair. The key is the position of 
    # the value in the line
    while read value; do
        vcolnum=$(echo $value | cut -d "=" -f 1)
        vvalue=$(echo $value | cut -d "=" -f 2)

        # The first value is the line variable name 
        # (s1, s2)                                       
        if [[ $vcolnum == "1" ]]; then
            varname=$vvalue
            continue
        fi

        # Get the name of the field by the column 
        # position                                                     
        field=${coltofield[$vcolnum]}

        # Add the value to the current sum for this field
        computation[$field]=$((computation[$field]+${vvalue}))
    done < <(echo $line | sed  -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//;' -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//;' -e 's/[[:space:]]\+/\n/g;' | nl -n ln  | sed -e 's/[[:space:]]\+/=/g;')


    if [[ $headerdone == "0" ]]; then
        echo -e -n "\t"
        for key in ${!computation[@]}; do echo -n -e "$key\t" ; done; echo
        headerdone=1
    fi

    echo -n -e "$varname\t"
    for value in ${computation[@]}; do echo -n -e "$value\t"; done; echo

    computation=()

done < <(tail -n +2 $1)
share|improve this answer
    
The above is very inefficient, will fail in surprising ways for various input file contents and names, and unnecessarily relies on GNU tools. There's too many issues to list in a comment. –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 14:15
    
It would be more helpful if you would provide a very imprecise list of possible errors instead of devalue the answer of another user. –  Oliver F. Nov 30 '12 at 16:41
    
I'm not devaluing it, and I did provide an imprecise list of possible errors (it's inefficient and will fail for various input file contents and name). It just literally has too many issues to list them all specifically in a comment, as I said, and what would be the point in pointing out one or 2 examples of the problems when there's a dozen more? I don't want to get into a long chain of comments or other discussion on every issue when the script just needs to be re-written. –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 16:47
    
In case it helps to show one of my concerns, here's the output of running time on the awk script I posted: $ time awk -f tst.awk file = real 0m0.078s user 0m0.030s sys 0m0.077s vs the shell script above: $ time ./tst.sh file = real 0m3.766s user 0m3.139s sys 0m3.350s. So, the shell script is 2 orders of magnitude slower than necessary. Add in all of the potential problems due to unquoted variables, incorrect use of read, use of external commands, etc. and I hope you can understand why I don't think it's feasible or worthwhile to list all of the issues. –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 16:59
    
Of course a pure Awk solution is faster than a shell script. But why is the use of read incorrect? How could I improve it from your point of view? BTW, the question wasn't to provide the fastest solution and IMHO the usage of extenal commands is ok for a shell script. Of course for a portable solution I would choose a different approach. –  Oliver F. Nov 30 '12 at 17:25
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Yet another AWK alternative:

$ cat f
   x y  x  y
s1 3 4  6 10
s2 3 9 10  7
s3 7 1  3  2

$ cat f.awk
BEGIN {
OFS="\t";
}

NR==1 {
  #need header for 1st column
  for(f=NF; f>=1; --f)
    $(f+1) = $f;
  $1="";

  for(f=1; f<=NF; ++f)
    fld2hdr[f]=$f;
}

{
  for(f=1; f<=NF; ++f)
    if($f ~ /^[0-9]/)
      colValues[fld2hdr[f]]+=$f;
    else
      colValues[fld2hdr[f]]=$f;

  for (i in colValues)
    row = row colValues[i] OFS;
  print row;

  split("", colValues);
  row=""
}

$ awk -f f.awk f
        x       y
s1      9       14
s2      13      16
s3      10      3
share|improve this answer
    
Courtesy of the "in" operator in for (i in colValues) you could get the y values then the "s1" etc. values and then the "x" values or some other order of output. I don't think you need 2 loops in your NR==1 section, you could just do for(f=1; f<=NF; ++f) fld2hdr[f]=$(f+1). Finally, you could get rid of all the null statements (spurious trailing semi-colons). –  Ed Morton Dec 1 '12 at 0:41
    
@EdMorton 1-Courtesy: you're right, we can solve that in gawk adding PROCINFO["sorted_in"]="@ind_str_asc" to the BEGIN block. 2-loops: I don't think so: I thought the problem as one header for each column, but the first line lacks the first header (the header for the s1..) so we should add it (that's the 1st loop task) (you can try your suggestion and see how the headers will appear garbled). 3-null statements: I think those are a C habit :) hopefully they don't hurt in this case. Thanks for the comments. –  German Garcia Dec 1 '12 at 1:15
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$ awk 'BEGIN{print "   x y"} a=$2+$4, b=$3+$5 {print $1, a, b}' file
   x y
s1 9 14
s2 13 16
s3 10 3

No doubt there is a better way to display the heading but my awk is a little sketchy.

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Ive been using awk for a while now and I've no idea what a=$2+$4, b=$3+$5 in the condition part of your script will do (though I THINK that if b ends up with the value zero then your action part won't get executed) - care to clarify? –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 14:38
    
@EdMorton you're the awk guru i'm a relative noob, I really should improve my awk at some point, I believe what you said is true, anyway the hack works. –  sudo_O Nov 30 '12 at 14:52
    
I'm honestly just trying to understand what it does, no criticism intended. Could you explain it? –  Ed Morton Nov 30 '12 at 15:00
    
I know, don't take my comment the wrong way, I just hacked it together, nothing fancy going on I don't believe.. set a to value of column 2 + column 4, set b to value of column 3 + column 5 and print print column column 1, value of a, value of b. –  sudo_O Nov 30 '12 at 15:04
2  
Finally found out what the flicker is that comma doing: it's acting as a record range, restarting again for each line (because both conditions are true for most of the fields, so it starts and stops a range at each line.. until e.g. we have two "y" fields set to 0 that make condition b false, and then awk doesn't restart the range for the next line, and then the first condition is not reevaluated, and then a keeps the previous value.. so we have problems there) (similar problems would be when both "x" fields are/sum 0). Cheers. –  German Garcia Dec 1 '12 at 13:17
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Here's a Perl solution, just for fun:

cat table.txt | perl -e'@h=grep{$_}split/\s+/,<>;while(@l=grep{$_}split/\s+/,<>){for$i(1..$#l){$t{$l[0]}{$h[$i-1]}+=$l[$i]}};printf "    %s\n",(join"  ",sort keys%{$t{(keys%t)[0]}});for$h(sort keys%t){printf"$h %s\n",(join " ",map{sprintf"%2d",$_}@{$t{$h}}{sort keys%{$t{$h}}})};'
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