Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was trying to figure out how to set HTTP status header to 500 if there was php fatal error (for handling AJAX requests).

Related question: How can I get php to return 500 upon encountering a fatal exception?

I don't want to use register_shutdown_function which in my opinion is not an elegant solution.

Is below code a good solution?

Will it always work for fatal errors?

I assume that application code has no output untill last echo call and there are no calls to flush() function (which after invocation prevents modifying headers).

<?php

set_status_code(500);

// ...
// (application code with no output)

// Application didn't crash up to this point,
// so we set http status code 200.
set_status_code(200);

echo $outputBuffer;

Is flush() the only function that breaks desired behaviour?

share|improve this question
    
..why would there be a fatal error? –  Mārtiņš Briedis Nov 30 '12 at 11:40
2  
Apache (or your webserver of choice) should return a 500 automatically if PHP crashes outright. –  deceze Nov 30 '12 at 11:42
1  
@deceze It was Xdebugs fault. After disabling it then it works (related). –  Jan Święcki Nov 30 '12 at 12:08
1  
I'd agree with @MrCode. I'd consider it bad practice to be setting an error 500 explicitly. A 500 error should be generated when you have a fatal server error -- ie the server software has crashed, or is misconfigured or is unable to run for some reason. It should not be used as an error code for software that has run without crashing. Like MrCode, I would prefer to use a response code within your Ajax response, but if you must use a HTTP response code, the 400-range error codes are more apprpriate than a 500 code. –  SDC Nov 30 '12 at 13:49
1  
if the program is still running, then the error is not fatal. By definition, if your program is able to set the http code, then code 500 is not really appropriate. –  SDC Nov 30 '12 at 14:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you turn off PHP errors, Apache will give a 500 status code whenever a fatal PHP error occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
<?php ini_set("display_errors", "off"); throw new Exception("lolwut"); does't give 500 status code on Apache. How do I make this work? –  Jan Święcki Nov 30 '12 at 11:53
    
@JanŚwięcki How are you checking the status code? –  Wayne Whitty Nov 30 '12 at 11:58
1  
FireBug, Fiddler2. Ok, I figured this out. Xdebug was the problem (check this out). Thanks! :) –  Jan Święcki Nov 30 '12 at 12:06
1  
On PHP 5.4 Xdebug shows error 500 an works fine. Related: php/xdebug bug. –  Jan Święcki Nov 30 '12 at 12:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.