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I have a method

**int** create_object(Object* parent, char* name, int type, int start_block) {
  ...
  return ptr_to_object;
}

Inside the function ptr_to_object seems to be a 32-bits but then as soon as it gets out of it, it looks like its 64-bits.

Note: I cannot use c99, I know that intptr_t is part of c99.

What are your suggestions? Thanks!

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closed as not a real question by SomeWittyUsername, Christian Rau, ecatmur, Nikos C., 一二三 Dec 1 '12 at 10:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
What is the type of ptr_to_object, and is there any reason you can't return an actual pointer instead of an integer ? (i.e.g return an Object* ) – nos Nov 30 '12 at 11:42
    
Not entirely standard, but often long seems to be enough for pointers. Again, not standard. – Shahbaz Nov 30 '12 at 12:04
    
**int** What type is this supposed to be? – Lundin Nov 30 '12 at 12:19
    
@Shahbaz It just happens to be so on many contemporary platforms, but it's not standardized in any way. Never use integers to store pointers, if a generic pointer is needed use void *. – Joachim Pileborg Nov 30 '12 at 12:19
    
If a pointer will fit inside an int, the standard guarantees that everything will work just fine. But If it doesn't fit, then it is undefined behavior and the CPU is free to halt and catch fire. – Lundin Nov 30 '12 at 12:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're dealing with pointers, either use a pointer return type, or "hide" it in an int-type defined by the standard to be large enough to support holding a pointer. Such a type can exist but is not guaranteed to exist (tmk):

C99 7.20.1.4 Integer types capable of holding object pointers

  1. The following type designates a signed integer type with the property that any valid pointer to void can be converted to this type, then converted back to pointer to void, and the result will compare equal to the original pointer:

    intptr_t

    The following type designates an unsigned integer type with the property that any valid pointer to void can be converted to this type, then converted back to pointer to void, and the result will compare equal to the original pointer:

    uintptr_t

    These types are optional.

The keyword there is optional. Chance are likely it is defined on your platform of choice, but for legacy portability you're probably better off either returning a void * or declaring a specialized "handle" to a typed or void pointer and returning that.

As always, I'm entirely interested in anyone that is working with a C99-compliant platform that chose not to expose some of the features presented as optional in the standard (like this one). If there is anyone out that with a <stdint.h> without intptr_t and/or uintptr_t I'm very curious. Please leave a comment if you work with such a toolchain.

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Like @nos says, if you're dealing with pointers then use a pointer type. Converting them to integers is non-portable and error prone.

If you don't want callers to know it's a pointer (without digging a little anyway), then use typedef to create a "handle" type, or something:

typedef my_ptr* object_handle;

In fact, do this even if your "handle" really is an integer. The abstraction will allow you to change it is later without any calling code needing modification.

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