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My code opens a text file, counts the number of lines, allocates an array to store all lines and then calls a function to fill this array with each line. This function file.getline calls return empty strings:

Here's the code:

typedef char* line;

...

char* filename=new char[256];
cout << "Type a file name: " << endl;
cin.ignore();
cin.getline(filename,255);

ifstream iFile(filename);

int nLines=CountLines(iFile);

line* LineArray = new line[nLines];
ReadLines(LineArray,iFile);

CountLines function:

int CountLines(ifstream &file)
{
line templine=new char[64];
int nLines=0;

while (!file.eof())
{
    file.getline(templine,64);

    if (*templine != '\n')
        nLines++;

}
delete [] templine;

return nLines;
}

This works properly. ReadLines however does not:

void ReadLines(line* LineArray, ifstream &file)
{
    line templine=new char[64];

file.seekg(0,ios::beg);

int i = 0;
while (!file.eof())
{

    if (*templine != '\n')
    {
        LineArray[i]=templine;
        i++;
    }

}
delete [] templine;
}

I have a feeling that it has something to do with the '\n' issue of getline but as I set the get pointer to 0 and the file starts with normal text and not a line, I can't understand why it fills templine with empty strings.

share|improve this question
4  
Use std::vector and std::string, it will your life so much easier. Also, you have a a lot of potential memory leaks. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 30 '12 at 12:21
1  
LineArray[i]=templine; where do you accumulate i? –  xiaoyi Nov 30 '12 at 12:22
5  
Don't use while (!file.eof())! It checks if the previous read was the end of file. You want while (file.getline(...)). (This seems to be popping up surprisingly often recently) –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 30 '12 at 12:22
    
pardon me about the problem with i, I just replaced my for loop with the while and forgot to i++ it. it still had the issue in the for loop –  Tsaras Nov 30 '12 at 12:24
    
@Tsaras Can you correct it to what it should say then? –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 30 '12 at 12:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are too many bugs in your code.

  • Parameters for istream::getline() is wrong
  • You need clear eof flag after CountLines()
  • Wrong memory free operation.
  • blah blah ...

Pointers are not toys, you'd better go with Tino Didriksen's solution.

If you really like char and pointers, it should look like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cassert>

using namespace std;

int CountLines(ifstream &fin) {
  char templine[1024];      // no need for dynamic allocation.
  int count = 0;
  while (fin.getline(templine, 1024))
    count++;
  return count;
}

void ReadLines(char** lines, int count, ifstream &fin) {
  fin.seekg(0, ios::beg);
  for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    lines[i] = new char[1024];      // you need dynamic allocation here.
    fin.getline(lines[i], 1024);
    assert(fin.gcount() < 1024);    // assure the line is shorter than 1023 chars
  }
}

int main() {

  char filename[256];         // no need for dynamic allocation.
  cin.getline(filename, 256); // second parameter should be the same size of your buffer.

  ifstream fin(filename);

  int count = CountLines(fin);
  char** lines = new char*[count];

  // After CountLines() called, fin.eof is set, you need to clear it.
  // Otherwise fin.getline() won't do a thing.
  fin.clear();
  ReadLines(lines, count, fin);

  // When every thing is done, you need to free all the memory.
  for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    delete[] lines[i];
  delete[] lines;

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for detailed clarification but honestly you could do without the offensive tone. I just started C like 2 weeks ago and I prefer to learn the basics i.e. pointer operations than going straight to automated stuff –  Tsaras Nov 30 '12 at 22:48
    
@Tsaras oh, sorry for that. I knew you were new to C, you really shouldn't play with pointers, cause even you do it wrong, you can't tell, and in most cases system won't emit an error. And you are not using C, it's C++. –  xiaoyi Dec 1 '12 at 4:30

You don't need to first count lines then read lines. You can do

#include <istream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

std::vector<std::string> ReadLines(std::istream& is) {
    std::vector<std::string> lines;
    std::string line;

    while (std::getline(is, line)) {
        lines.push_back(line);
    }

    return lines;
}

which will return a std::vector with all lines, without any fuss or manual memory management.

share|improve this answer

Your mistake is in this code:

if (*templine != '\n')

because your are checking the first symbol in line.

You should change code like this:

int CountLines(ifstream &file)
{
    string line;
    int nLines=0;
    while(getline(file,line))
        nLines++;

    return nLines;
}


void ReadLines(string LineArray, ifstream &file)
{
    file.seekg(0,ios::beg);

    string line;
    while(getline(file,line))
    {
        LineArray += line;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I used your code structure while preserving my char* s instead of your strings and ReadLines still reads empty strings from the first loop –  Tsaras Nov 30 '12 at 12:43

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