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I use the Flags on enums in C# and everything is fine but want to use something similar in SQL in the following scenario:

We want to return a list of users that are part of a list or conditions like so:

ConditionOne = 2
ConditionTwo = 4
ConditionThree = 8

etc...

We will have users with some of these conditions against them like so:

User1: 6 (conditions 1 and 2)
User2: 4 (condition 2)
User3: 14 (conditions 1, 2 and 3)

etc...

We want to be able to do a query where we say get all users with condition 1 and in this scenario it would return users 1 and 3 even though they have other conditions as well.

Any insight would be greatly appreciated, only used Flags in C# and not in Sql Server directly.

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2  
It would be more "SQL-like" to store this information in a many-to-many table. So you'd store rows (1,1),(1,2),(2,2),(3,1),(3,2),(3,3) in a separate table. It would make for more natural querying, and offers indexing opportunities. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 30 '12 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

The bitwise operator in SQL is &. The WHERE clause needs to evaluate to a BOOLEAN expression, like this:

create table #temp (id int, username varchar(20), flags int)

insert into #temp values
(1, 'User1', 6),
(2, 'User2', 4),
(3, 'User3', 14)

declare @ConditionOne int = 2

select *
from   #temp
where  flags & @ConditionOne <> 0

drop table #temp

This query returns the following dataset:

id          username             flags
----------- -------------------- -----------
1           User1                6
3           User3                14
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While the bitwise operator suggested by James will work, it will not be very performant in a relational database, especially when you try to scale to millions of records. The reason is that functions in the where clause are not sargable (they prevent an index seek).

What I would do would be create a table which contains all possible combinations of flags and conditions, which will enable an index seek on the condition.

Populate FlagConditions. I used a single (tinyint). Should you need more Flags, you should be able to expand on this approach:

CREATE TABLE FlagConditions (
      Flag TINYINT
    , Condition TINYINT
    , CONSTRAINT Flag_Condition PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (Condition,Flag)
);

CREATE TABLE #Flags (
      Flag TINYINT IDENTITY(0,1) PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
    , DummyColumn BIT NULL);
GO

INSERT #Flags
        ( DummyColumn )
SELECT NULL;
GO 256

CREATE TABLE #Conditions(Condition TINYINT PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED);

INSERT #Conditions ( Condition )
    VALUES  (1),(2),(4),(8),(16),(32),(64),(128);

INSERT FlagConditions ( Flag, Condition )        
    SELECT
    Flag, Flag & Condition
    FROM #Flags f
    CROSS JOIN #Conditions c
    WHERE Flag & Condition <> 0;

DROP TABLE #Flags;
DROP TABLE #Conditions;

Now you can use the FlagConditions table any time you need to efficiently seek on an enum bitwise condition:

DECLARE @UserFlags TABLE (Username varchar(10), Flag tinyint);

INSERT @UserFlags(Username, Flag)
    VALUES ('User1',6),('User2',4),('User3',14);

DECLARE @Condition TINYINT = 2;

SELECT u.*
FROM @UserFlags u
INNER JOIN FlagConditions fc ON u.Flag = fc.Flag
WHERE fc.Condition = @Condition;

This returns:

Username   Flag
---------- ----
User1      6
User3      14

Your DBA will thank you for going this set oriented route.

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